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Archive for 2017

TIP OF THE DAY: 10+ Ways To Flavor Meatballs, Part 2

Chicken Meatballs

Foie Gras Stuffed Meatballs

Tuna Meatballs

Keftedes Appetizer

Indian Meatballs

Albondigas Soup

[1] Chicken meatballs served with a vegetable patty and artistic salad, at Ikea. [2] Meatballs stuffed with foie gras at Cheu Noodle Bar (photo courtesy Tina Wong | The Wandering Eater). [3] Polpette de tonno, tuna meatballs. Here’s the recipe from Ricette Della Nonna. [4] Keftedes, Greek meatballs. Here’s the recipe from Bowl of Delicious. [5] Indian spices and pappadums make these meatballs special. Here’s the recipe from BBC Good Food. [6] Albondigas, Mexican meatballs served in soup. Here’s the recipe from Fresh By Northwest.

 

Yesterday we featured the first five of ten meatball trends.

To sum up, the first five include:

  • Stuffed Meatballs
  • Lamb Meatballs
  • Asian Meatballs
  • Floating Meatballs
  • Vegetarian & Vegan Meatballs
  •  
    Today we finish the list.

    6. POULTRY MEATBALLS

    For health and sustainability, chicken (photo #1) and turkey meatballs have become popular over the last two decades. Duck meatballs have become the darlings of some chefs, who grind their own duck meat.

    If you don’t already serve poultry meatballs, expand your repertoire in traditional ways (with spaghetti, on heros) and new ones.

  • Substitute chicken or turkey meatballs for the chicken breast in stir-fries, sweet-and-sour dishes, General Tso’s Chicken and other Asian-style recipes.
  • Present chicken meatballs Buffalo-style. Roll them in hot sauce and serve with blue cheese dressing and celery and carrot sticks.
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    Restaurant Creations:

  • Turkey meatballs mixed with onions, celery, and carrots; served with cranberry jelly and a traditional gravy at the Meatball Room, Boca Raton, Florida.
  • Chicken meatballs seasoned with herbs and a hint of red pepper, sprinkled with Italian cheeses and served in a zesty marinara sauce at Olive Garden.
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    7. UPSCALE MEATBALLS

    Traditionally, meatballs have been a more economical way to enjoy meat. But you can reverse the situation by adding higher-end ingredients.

  • Create a luxe meatball stuffed with foie gras and minced truffles (photo #2).
  • Make a “surf and turf” meatball stuffed with chopped lobster, shrimp or crab.
  • Blend chopped chuck with pricer cuts, like brisket and short rib.
  •  
    Restaurant Creations:

  • Foie gras-stuffed meatballs with plum sauce at Cheu Noodle Bar in Philadelphia.
  • Grilled beef meatballs with braised beet greens, sofrito and tomatoes, at Bestia in Los Angeles.
  • Duck Meatballs alla Toscana filled with fontina, parmesan and provolone, porcini mushrooms, whipped ricotta, mascarpone and dried cherries, in a port wine and veal reduction, at Fresco by Scotto in New York City.
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    8. SEAFOOD MEATBALLS

    If fish or shellfish can be formed into burgers, patties or cakes, then they can be formed into meatballs.

  • See what other cultures are doing with ground or minced seafood, such as French quenelles, Thai fish cakes, Chinese fish balls and Japanese take yaki (octopus balls).
  • Ground fresh tuna and other meaty fish are especially adaptable to an Italian-style meatball, like Sicilian polpette di tonno (photo #3).
  •  
    Restaurant Creations:

  • Polpette di Pesce Spada: baked swordfish meatballs simmered in a spicy homemade tartar sauce. at Calabria Restaurant & Pizzeria, Livingston, N.J.
  • Oyster Room Meatball Sub: pork-oyster meatballs, napa cabbage slaw, smoked oyster mayonnaise, ciabatta bread, at Boone’s Fish House & Oyster Room, Portland, Maine.
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    9. INTERNATIONAL MEATBALLS

    You can find meatballs almost everywhere around the globe: kofte (Middle Eastern); bun cha (Vietnamese); frikadeller (Danish); bakso (Indonesian); klopsiki (Polish); kofta (Indian). Go global with international recipes (photo #5), or just use the country’s signature spices in your own meatballs.

  • Mix ground pork, grated Manchego and pimentón, and serve on a toothpick with a roasted piquillo pepper sauce or saffron aïoli.
  • Turn your favorite global flavors—allspice, cumin, curry, harissa, garam masala, etc.—into meatball seasonings.
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    Restaurant Creations:

  • Mexican albondigas with salsa verde, cotija, pine nut, fried egg and masa (corn) cake at Bar Amá in Los Angeles.
  • Greek keftedes (photos #4 and #5), fried meatballs of ground beef and lamb with garlic, onions and mint, at Alchemy in San Diego.
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    10. SPICY MEATBALLS

    In 1969, Alka-Seltzer famously based a commercial on the line uttered by a man who had eaten a too-spicy meatball: “Mama mia, that’s a spicy meatball!” If you’re old enough to remember, you may still use that line, along with “Where’s the beef” and other classics.

    Things have changed a lot since then. Americans have embraced heat, from chiles and hot sauces, in just about everything. So the Alka-Selter wouldn’t eat today higher spice levels. Instead, consider:

  • Add smoky heat to the ground meat or its sauce via chipotle in adobo sauce.
  • Use an on-trend condiment such as sriracha or Korean gochujang to add heat to meatballs.
  •  
    Restaurant Creations:

  • Spicy ricotta meatballs: beef, veal and ricotta meatballs with red chiles and caramelized onions, at Romano’s Macaroni Grill, 30 locations nationwide.
  • Chorizo meatballs, with roasted tomatoes, celery heart and onion, saffron with pecorino gratinée, at Soya & Pomodoro, Miami.
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    Don’t forget to plan a meatball party to enjoy the whole group.

    Back to Part 1.

     
    MORE MEATBALLS

  • Chicken Teriyaki Meatballs
  • Eyeball Meatball Sandwich (for kids)
  • Giant Meatball
  • Gourmet Meatball Sub
  • Inside-Out Spaghetti & Meatballs
  • Korean Spaghetti & Meatballs
  • Spaghetti & Meatball Sundae
  • Swedish Meatballs
  • Veal Meatballs With Vodka
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    ST. PATRICK’S DAY: Chocolate Peanut Butter Irish Soda Bread

    We love Irish soda bread, in the traditional recipe with raisins and a savory version made with cheddar cheese (in the same article).

    But here’s a version of Irish soda bread that is not tradition in the Emerald Isle. It was created by Christine Fischer of Wry Toast Eats.

    Christine uses Chocolate Dreams peanut butter (photo #4) from PB & Co., to create swirls of dark chocolate PB in the bread.

    Can’t have/don’t like peanut butter? Add the chocolate chips only, and substitute 1/2 cup of dried cherries, cranberries or raisins for the PB.

    RECIPE: CHOCOLATE PEANUT BUTTER IRISH SODA BREAD

    Prep time is 30 minutes plus freezing time; cook time is 40-45 minutes.

    Ingredients For 8-10 Servings

  • 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 2/3 cup Dark Chocolate Dreams peanut butter
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • 3/4 cup + 1 tablespoon nonfat milk
  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar
  • 2 cups all purpose flour + extra flour for kneading
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • Pinch salt
  • 2 tablespoon salted butter, melted
  • Shortening to grease
  • Parchment paper for peanut butter chocolate chunks
  •  
    For Serving

  • Butter (softened)
  • Tea (Irish Breakfast tea can be enjoyed any time of day)
  •  
    Preparation

    1. MELT the chocolate chips in a small saucepan over low heat, about 2 minutes. Once melted, add the peanut butter and vegetable oil, stirring until well combined. Pour into parchment-lined baking dish, distributing evenly (photo #1). Transfer to the freezer and chill for at least 1 hour (photo #2).

    2. PREHEAT the oven to 360°F. Amply grease a round 9” baking pan and set aside.

    3. COMBINE the milk and white vinegar in a small bowl, stirring gently. Allow the ingredients to sit for 10 minutes until the milk begins to curdle. Once the milk curdles…

    4. COMBINE the flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, and salt in large mixing bowl, whisking until mixed. Gently stir in the frozen chocolate chunks.

    5. SLOWLY ADD the curdled milk to the flour mixture, stirring until the dough begins to take shape. If needed, add an extra tablespoon or two of milk. Once the dough has formed…

    6. TRANSFER to a floured surface and kneed several times before forming into a ball. While kneading the dough, the peanut butter chunks should begin to melt and spread. It’s a bit messy, but use the extra flour as needed to make forming a ball manageable. When ready…

    7. TRANSFER the dough to the greased baking pan. Cut an “X” into the top of the dough. A cross cut before baking allows the heat to penetrate into the thickest part of the bread. As a bonus in a Catholic country like Ireland, it adds the symbolic note of giving thanks.

     

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01 data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/Dark Chocolate Dreams Irish Soda Bread cookingwithcake ilovePB 230

    Chocolate Irish Soda Bread Recipe

    /home/content/p3pnexwpnas01 data02/07/2891007/html/wp content/uploads/Chocolate PB Irish Soda Bread ilovePB 230

    Dark Chocolate Dreams Peanut Butter

    [1] Step 1: Melt the chocolate, then [2] freeze it for an hour. [3] Fresh from the oven. [4] Photos courtesy Christine Fischer and PB & Co.

     
    8. USE a pastry brush to coat the entire surface with melted butter. Bake for 40-45 minutes until a toothpick comes out of the center clean and the top is browned and crisp (photo #3).

    9. SLICE and serve immediately, slathering with extra butter as desired; or let it cool as you prefer.

    THE HISTORY OF IRISH SODA BREAD

    Baking soda, called bread soda in Ireland, was invented in the early 1800s. In those days most people didn’t have an oven. They cooked in a fireplace over coals or a peat fire (called turf fire in Ireland). They placed the dough in a lidded cast-iron pot which went right on top of the fire.

    In County Donegal and County Leitrim, there was a tradition of adding caraway seeds to bread. Immigrants brought that recipe to the U.S. In America, the recipe evolved to include butter, eggs, raisins and sugar—ingredients which frugal housewives in Ireland wouldn’t have thought to add to the dough.

    Today, the soda bread recipe options include:

  • White soda bread: all-purpose flour, baking soda, salt, buttermilk and optional caraway seeds.
  • Brown soda bread, also a traditional recipe that substitutes whole wheat flour for part or all or all of the white flour.
  • Irish soda bread with raisins and caraway, the classic Irish-American version also made with sugar, butter, and eggs.
  • Numerous modern recipes, from healthier variations of whole grains, flax and sunflower seeds to walnut soda bread to oat soda bread with browned butter, rosemary and black pepper…to the recipe above with chocolate peanut butter.
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    TIP OF THE DAY: 10+ Ways To Flavor Meatballs

    Spaghetti Stuffed Meatball

    Lamb Meatballs

    Asian Meatballs

    Vietnamese Pho With Meatballs

    Shanghai Lion's Head Meatballs

    Carrot Soup With Turkey Meatballs

    [1] Spaghetti-stuffed meatballs. Here’s the recipe from Thrillist (photo by Drew Swantak). [2] Lamb and feta meatballs; here’s the recipe from Smitten Kitchen. [4] Vietnamese who with meatballs. Here’s the recipe from Cooking And Beer. [5] Shanghai Lion’s Head; here’s the recipe from Serious Eats. [6] Floating meatballs made from turkey, in carrot soup with spinach. Here’s the recipe from Parade.

     

    MEATBALL TRENDS

    What’s trending as of March 9th, National Meatball Day?

    Flavor & The Menu, a magazine and website for chefs, took a look at what’s happening with meatballs.

    Meatballs have been popping up on menus nationwide—beyond Italian restaurants, sub shops and the emerging meatball restaurants.

    The ideas below may be new to some of us, but most of the recipes go back for centuries, if not longer.

    Meatballs are being made with almost any ground or chopped meat, seafood, poultry, and vegetarian/vegan versions made with beans, grains and veggies.

    Not only are meatballs a comfort food; they’re a canvas for endless versatility in formats, sauces, seasonings, sizes and garnishes.

    Ten flavor trends were spotted by by Joan Lang, who wrote the article.

    How About A Meatball Party??

    The tempting variety of meatballs inspired us to plan a DIY Meatball Party, with a buffet of fixings from breads (pita, Italian rolls) to bases (pasta, cellophane noodles, rice or other grains), to condiments (grated or crumbled cheese) and raw vegetables (cucumber, lettuce, onion, tomato) and fresh herbs.

    For a variety of choices, you can make meatball recipes as time permits, and freeze them until you have what you want for the party. If your guests typically ask what they can bring (and are good cooks), give them recipes to prepare.

    TREND ONE THROUGH TREND FIVE

    Today we present the first five meatball trends. The others arrive tomorrow.

    Whatever types of meatballs appeal to you, you’ll find score of recipes online.

    1. STUFFED MEATBALLS

    Stuffed meatballs require only the simple addition of a tasty filling inside a handful of ground meat. Don’t tell anyone, and let them be surprised when they dig in.

    Different types of cheeses are the traditional stuffings—everything from mild mozzarella and ricotta to tangy blue and feta.

    But we’ve also found meatballs stuffed with spaghetti (photo #1) and with mac and cheese. More examples:

  • Polpetta Napoletana: A meatball stuffed with ham, peas and mozzarella in tomato sauce, at Bella Tuscany in Windemere, Florida.
  • Spaghetaboudit Meatball: A classic meatball stuffed with three cheeses and fusilli pasta, topped with marinara and shaved Parmesan. It’s also garnished with ricotta, at The Meatball Room in Boca Raton, Florida.
  • Brisket Meatballs: An interesting concept, stuffed with blue cheese and accented with a balsamic glaze, at Clark Food & Wine Co. in Dallas.
  •  
    2. LAMB MEATBALLS

    Inspired by Greek recipes, lamb meatballs—keftedes—will make lamb lovers happy. We purchase ground lamb and mix it with crumbled feta and herbs (photo #2). Or, you could stuff them with feta, for the surprise.

    Mixed with mix with bulgur wheat, it becomes Lebanese-style kibbeh. Add a yogurt sauce.

    Use plenty of Mediterranean spices—basil, cilantro, dill, rosemary, oregano, sage, thyme. Check out the spices: cinnamon, coriander, cumin, nutmeg and za’atar. You can:

  • Shape the meat mixture into small balls like falafel, serve it in pita with yogurt sauce, tahini and hummus and raw veggies: cucumber, red onion, shredded lettuce and/or tomato.
  • Serve them over pasta or grains, with yogurt sauce flavored with dill, lemon or mint.
  • Serve on skewers with a plate of sautéed or roasted vegetables.
  • Make them slightly larger than cherry tomatoes, and serve in a bowl with the tomatoes and an herb garnish as a cocktail snack (with picks), plain with a squeeze of lemon juice or with a yogurt-garlic-dill dipping sauce (recipe).
  • Serve with fresh mint chimichurri and yogurt sauce, as at Mud Hen Tavern in Los Angeles.
  • Make soutzoukakia, grilled lamb meatballs with spiced tomato sauce and Greek yogurt, as at Kokkari, San Francisco.
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    3. ASIAN MEATBALLS

    The meatballs of Asia are typically made from pork or seafood, and to a smaller extent chicken. Consider:

  • Vietnamese/Laotian pho noodle soup with meatballs (photo #4). You can add them to Asian soup or ramen bowls, too.
  • Shanghai Lion’s Head, a dish of large pork meatballs stewed or steamed with cabbage. Here’s a recipe from Serious Eats.
  • Shrimp balls: fried balls of chopped shrimp, drizzled with katsu sauce and/or Kewpie mayonnaise.
  • Tako yaki, deep fried octopus balls.
  • Tsukune, a Japanese chicken meatball most often cooked yakitori style, and sometimes covered in a sweet soy sauce or yakitori tare, which is often mistaken for teriyaki sauce but is its own recipe.
  •  
    We like this Asian Meatballs recipe from Life Makes Simple Bakes. Its served with a hoisin-based sauce, and traditional Asian flavors (photo #3).
     
    Chefs are making:

  • Meatball Spring Rolls: steamed rice paper wrapped around pork meatballs, pickled carrots and vermicelli, served with peanut sauce, at Pho Bistro in Malden, Massachusetts.
  • Tsukune: chicken meatballs with a choice of flavorings, including teriyaki, spicy miso, yuzu, daikon, goma (sesasme), kimchi, curry and cheese fondue—at Tsukuneya Robata Grill in Honolulu.
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    4. FLOATING MEATBALLS

    These are meatballs in soups and stews that incorporate meatballs as the protein, either braised or cooked right in the liquid. Consider:

  • Mexican sopa de albondigas, Bavarian meatball soup, Italian meatball stew or many others from world cuisine.
  • Chickpea Stew with Meatballs and Shrimp, including with garlic, spinach and seasoned basmati rice, at Pasha Cafe, Arlington, Virginia.
  • Steamed Pork Meatball Soup with crispy garlic, bok choy shoots and black soy sauce, at Kin Shop in New York City.
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    5. VEGETARIAN & VEGAN MEATBALLS

    Talk about Meatless Mondays! Of course, they should be called meat-alternative or meat-like balls; but convention calls them meatballs.

    There are many recipes on line, but we like the ones that use vegetables and grains rather than meat alternatives. Try:

  • Mushroom “meat” balls, made with cultivated white mushrooms or more exotic porcini: umami and heft without the meat.
  • Ground cooked potato meatballs with carrots and pea.
  • White beans meatballs with sautéed minced onions and garlic, seasoned and rolled in breadcrumbs.
  • Sauer-Tot Balls: potato and sauerkraut veggie balls served with lettuce and Dijon sauce on a hoagie, at the Barone Meatball Company, a food truck in Raleigh/Durham, North Carolina.
  • Quinoa “meat” balls and spaghetti squash, served with marinara and basil pesto, at Vine Brook Tavern in Lexington, Massachusetts.
  •  
    Stay tuned for Part 2.

    MORE MEATBALLS

  • Chicken Teriyaki Meatballs
  • Eyeball Meatball Sandwich (for kids)
  • Giant Meatball
  • Gourmet Meatball Sub
  • Inside-Out Spaghetti & Meatballs
  • Korean Spaghetti & Meatballs
  • Spaghetti & Meatball Sundae
  • Swedish Meatballs
  • Veal Meatballs With Vodka
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    FOOD FUN: Giant Meatball

    March 9th is National Meatball Day. Check out the giant meatball from New York restaurant and nightclub Lavo, available today.

    Served in a six-inch cast iron skillet, the meatball rests in a sausage ragu, topped with whipped ricotta and garnished with a basil chiffonade (ribbons).

    Want to make your own giant meatballs? Here are two recipes:

  • From Martha Stewart, made with equal parts ground beef, pork and veal, baked, then simmered in marinara sauce.
  • An all-beef version from Proud Italian Cook.
  •  
    Serve it with:

  • A side of pasta with broccoli rabe or broccolini.
  • A side salad.
  • Garlic bread (recipe) and crostini (similar to garlic bread, but toasted in the oven until crisp).
  •  
    For dessert?

    Better fugetaboutit!

     

    Giant Meatball

    Have a giant meatball on National Meatball Day. Photo courtesy Lavo | NYC.

     
    Or if the strawberries are nice, serve them with some drops of aged balsamic vinegar.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Swedish Meatballs & The Other Meatballs Of Europe

    Swedish Meatballs

    Swedish Meatballs In Gravy

    Frozen Meatballs Ikea

    Frozen Mashed Potatoes Ikea

    Sour Cream

    Fresh Dill

    Lingonberry Preserves

    [1] Classic Swedish meatballs (here’s the recipe from The Kitchn). [2] Some people like lots of the sour cream gravy (here’s the recipe from The Recipe Critic). [3] Frozen meatballs from Ikea, in beef/pork, chicken or vegan. [4] Frozen mashed potatoes from Ikea. [5] Sour cream [6] Dill (photo courtesy Good Eggs). [7] Lingonberry preserves from Ikea.

     

    Cocktail parties in 1960s America had a set of de rigueur cocktail food that included cheese balls, deviled eggs, Lipton onion soup dip with potato chips, pigs in blankets, rumaki*, stuffed celery (often stuffed with olive cream cheese) and bite-size Swedish meatballs.

    In Sweden, these small meatballs are made wutg a blend of pork and beef seasoned with allspice, ginger and nutmeg. They are served in a tangy sour cream sauce with a side of mashed potatoes and cream sauce.

    In the U.S., many people serve Swedish meatballs over noodles. Well O.K., but that’s not authentic.

    For the true Swedish meatball experience, a serving of lingonberry preserves is as essential as cranberry sauce is to turkey in the U.S.

    What’s a lingonberry? It’s the Scandinavian version of America’s cranberry, also tart but half the size (see photo #7, below). They are different species of the same genus†.

    Swedish meatballs are Sweden’s number-one dish, the unofficial national dish (although BBC Good Food gives that honor to kanelbulle, a cinnamon bun).

    In the U.S. they have their own food holiday: March 9th.
     
    FOR A QUICK DISH, HEAD TO IKEA

    The Swedish-based retailer makes it easy, by selling the components for Swedish meatballs in their food markets. Ikea also sells a white gravy mix, but you can’t beat fresh sour cream—or homemade mashed potatoes, for that matter.

    The gravy is easy to make, just sour cream, butter and flour. Here’s a classic from-scratch recipe from The Kitchn. For the potatoes, just boil and mash with butter and/or milk or cream, plus seasonings. Fresh dill is a nice touch.

    At Ikea, you’ll find everything you need (except the fresh the sour cream sauce) to assemble the dish:

  • Meatballs, a.k.a. kottbüllar (frozen, in original, chicken and vegan, $8.99 per 2.2-pound package (photo #3 at left).
  • Mashed potatoes, a.k.a. allemansrätten (frozen), $2.49/package (photo #4 at left).
  • Cream sauce, a.k.a. gräddsås (a basic white sauce), $1.79/packet.
  • Lingonberry preserves, a.k.a. sylt lingon, $3.99/jar (photo #7).
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    SWEDISH MEATBALLS FROM SCRATCH

    Make your own with one of these recipes:

  • Swedish meatballs recipe from The Kitchn (this has the best explanation and photos—photo #1 above).
  • Swedish meatballs from Alton Brown.
  • Swedish meatballs swimming in gravy from The Recipe Critic (photo #2).
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    MEATBALLS AROUND EUROPE

    While we live in a city with a small chain of meatball shops (five types of meatballs, six sauces, a total of 30 combinations), our American experience has largely been the Italian-American meatball in tomato sauce.

    So we took a look at the traditional meatballs of other European countries. For the world list, including meatballs from the Americas and Asia, head here.

  • Albania: Fried meatballs with feta cheese.
  • Alsace, France: A blend of beef and pork with onions, bacon, eggs and bread, served plain or with cream sauce.
  • Armenia: Stewed meatballs and vegetables, often over rice.
  • Austria: Fried meatballs.
  • Bosnia: Made from ground beef and served with mashed potatoes.
  • Belgium: A blend of beef and pork with bread crumbs and sliced onions. Variations use different types of meat and chopped vegetables.
  • Bulgaria: Made from ground beef, pork or a blend, often with diced onions and soaked bread, pan- fried or grilled.
  • Croatia: Typically made with beef, pork or a blend, and served with mashed potatoes or rice, often with a tomato-based sauce.
  • Denmark: Usually a blend of ground pork and veal with onions and eggs, flattened somewhat for pan frying.
  • Estonia: Similar to those of Finnish and Swedish cuisine.
  • Finland: Ground beef or a beef/pork blend or reindeer meat, mixed with breadcrumbs soaked in milk or beef stock and finely chopped onions or French onion soup mix. Traditionally served with gravy, boiled or mashed potatoes, lingonberry jam and sometimes, pickled cucumber.
  • Germany: Along with traditional meat blends, a very famous recipe is Königsberger Klopse, which contain anchovy or salted herring, and served with caper sauce.
  • Greece: Fried meatballs with bread, onions, parsley and mint; or stewed meatballs mixed with rice.
  • Hungary: Pork mixed with minced onions, garlic, paprika, salt and breadcrumbs, deep fried in oil or pork fat and eaten with potatoes or fozelék, a thick Hungarian vegetable stew. Liver dumplings are popular in soups.
  • Italy: Meatballs are generally eaten as a main course or in a soup. Made from beef and/or pork and sometimes poultry, salt, black pepper, chopped garlic, olive oil, Romano cheese, eggs, bread crumbs, and parsley, mixed and rolled by hand to a golf ball size.
  • The Netherlands: Usually made from minced beef and pork, eggs, onion and bread crumbs. They are associated with Wednesday, as evidenced by the saying woensdag, gehaktdag (Wednesday, meatball day). They are often served with boiled potatoes and vegetables.
  • Norway: Different types of meatballs, all typically small, with influences from Sweden and Spain, served with with potatoes, pasta or both.
  • Poland: Seasoned ground meat with onion, eggs and bread crumbs, typically fried and served with tomato sauce, mushroom sauce or brown gravy, along with potatoes or rice.
  • Portugal: Meatballs are usually served with tomato sauce and pasta.
  • Romania and Moldova: Meatballs are made with pork or poultry, moistened mashed potatoes and spices, usually deep fried.
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  • Slovenia: Made with ground beef or a blend of pork and beef, served with mashed potatoes and a tomato-based sauce.
  • Spain (and Hispanic America): Originally a Berber or Arab dish, brought to Spain during the period of Muslim rule in the Middle Ages. Spanish albóndigas can be served as an appetizer or main course, often in a tomato sauce. Mexican albóndigas are commonly served in a soup with a light broth and vegetables.
  • Sweden: Ground beef or a blend of ground beef, pork and sometimes veal or elk, sometimes including breadcrumbs soaked in milk, finely chopped onions, broth and often, cream. They are seasoned with white pepper or allspice and salt. Traditionally served with sour cream gravy, mashed potatoes and lingonberry jam. Traditionally, they are small, around 2–3 centimeters (.79–1.18 inches) in diameter, although larger meatballs are often served at restaurants.
  • United Kingdom: Faggots are a type of spicy pork meatball. A faggot is traditionally made from pig’s heart, liver and fatty belly meat or bacon minced together, with herbs added for flavoring, and sometimes bread crumbs.
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    If you’re looking for ways to vary your meatballs, look no further!
    ________________

    *Rumaki, created at Trader Vic’s, are skewers of broiled, bacon-wrapped chicken livers and water chestnuts.

    †Here it is, food geeks: Lingonberry Order Ericales, Family Ericaceae, Genus Vaccinium, Subgenus Oxycoccus, Species Vitus-idaea. For the lingonberry, everything is the same except the species. The cranberry has four genuses (varieties): V. erythrocarpum, V. macrocarpum, V. microcarpum and V. oxycoccos.

    Blueberry, bilberry/whortleberry and huckleberry are members of the same genus. Lingonberry is also known as cowberry.

      

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