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Archive for May 4, 2017

FOOD FUN: Fried Eggs (And More) In Pepper Slices

We saw this photo on Tajín’s Facebook page, but couldn’t find a recipe.

Fortunately, it’s not too difficult to slice bell peppers and drop an egg inside each slice—along with some mildly spicy Tajín seasoning (it’s a cayenne, lime and salt blend).

We thought: What else can we make with a bell pepper rim?

Cooked Foods

  • Burger patties
  • Melting cheeses (see list below)
  • Grains (mounded inside)
  • Savory pancakes
  •  
    Uncooked Foods

    If the food isn’t cohesive enough to be mounded, make the slices taller; or trim a bit of the bottom of a half or whole pepper so it will stand.

  • Ceviche
  • Sashimi
  • Tuna and other protein salads
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    ABOUT TAJÍN SEASONING

    In Mexico, this spice blend of cayenne, lime and salt is used on just about anything, savory and sweet:

  • Fruits: raw, cooked, sorbets and ice pops: citrus, cucumber, melon, and tropical fruit (mango, papaya, pineapple, etc.)
  • Beverage glass glass rimmers
  • Eggs, grains, potatoes (including fries), vegetables
  • Snacks: popcorn, mozzarella sticks
  • Proteins: fish, meat, poultry, tofu
  • Just about anything else, from angel food cakes to salad dressings
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    GOOD MELTING CHEESES

    Good melting cheeses include, among others:

  • American muenster
  • Asiago
  • Cheddar
  • Colby
  • Edam
  • Gruyère and other Alpine cheeses (e.g. emmental, comté)
  • Fontina
  • Havarti
  • Hispanic melting cheeses (asadero, queso blanco, queso chihuahua, queso di papi, queso oaxaca, queso quesadilla)
  • Monterey jack
  • Mozzarella
  • Provolone
  • Reblochon
  • Taleggio
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    Fried Eggs In Bell Pepper Slices

    Fried Egg Veggie Bowl

    Tajin Seasoning

    [1] Slice the pepper, drop in the egg. [2] Enjoy as is, or in the center of a yummy bowl of greens (photo courtesy Hope Foods). [3] Tajín seasoning: cayenne, lime and salt (photos courtesy Tajín.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Different Margarita Rimmers

    chili-rim-richardsandovalrestaurants

    Half Rim Chipotle Salt Guava Margarita

    Smoked Salt Margarita Rim

    [1] Something different: a chili powder rim instead of salt. Or, mix the two. At Richard Sandoval restaurants. [2] A cayenne rim (Tajin seasoning) on a guava Margarita at Dos Caminos restaurants. [3] Smoked salt rims a classic Margarita from Noble Tequila.

     

    What’s your idea of the perfect margarita? With so many choices offered from salt to flavor, Milagro Tequila conducted a survey for National Margarita Day, February 22nd, and found that:

  • 91% of people prefer Margaritas fresh over those made with a pre-packaged mix (no surprise there!)
  • 1/3 of respondents prefer drinking their Margarita in a rocks glass rather than a big Margarita glass (you folks are the minority).
  • Nearly 2/3 of people prefer salt on the rim.
  • 70% of respondents prefer drinking from the salted rim rather than through a straw.
  • The majority of people prefer a classic Margarita to a fruit-flavored one (guava, passionfruit, peach, strawberry, etc.).
  • 40% like having an extra tequila shot mixed into their Margarita.
  • 2/3 of respondents prefer a Margarita made with blanco/silver tequila rather than the lightly aged reposado.
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    THINK BEYOND THE COARSE SALT

    First, there’s no need to buy “Margarita salt”: It’s just kosher salt with a higher price. You can also use coarse sea salt.

    But how about something other than coarse salt? The 70% of survey participants who want a salt rim might like a change of pace.

    Here are some options that complement a Margarita.

    You can use another rimmer that still maintains the spirit of the Margarita (and maybe attracts people who don’t want the extra salt).

    Flavored salt. There’s flavored salt, of course, in scores of variations from bacon, chipotle, smoked salts (alderwood, chardonnay oak, hickory or mesquite-smoked).

    Colored salt. You can get dramatic, with black lava or Cypress black salt, or red Hawaiian alaea salt. You can get pretty, with pink Himalayan salt.

    Heat. You can add heat with ghost pepper, habanero, jalapeño, and sriracha-flavored salts.

    Or just use “hot” spices from your kitchen for the rim: cayenne, Tajin seasoning (cayenne-based), chili powder or crushed chile flakes—straight or mixed with kosher salt.

    If you think hot rims might be too intense, make the currently trending half-rim (photo #2).

    Fruitiness. You can add fruitiness with lemon, lime and mango-flavored salts.

    Herbaceousness. You can buy blends of salts and herbs, or mix your own. Or use straight minced cilantro, or other fresh herbs.

    For starters, take a look at Seasalt.com.

    MORE ABOUT MARGARITAS

  • Is It A Margarita Or Not?
  • Margarita History
  • Deconstructed Margarita Shots
  • Frozen Grape Margarita
  • Frozen Margarita Mocktail
  • Smoky Margarita
  •  

     
      

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    FOOD FUN (For The Affluent): Lobster-Topped Guacamole

    RA Sushi, a small restaurant group in the southern U.S., has imagination and class.

    With locations in Atlanta, Arizona (5 locations), Baltimore, Chicago, Florida (3), Leawood, Kansas, Las Vegas, Southern California (5) and Texas (6), sushi lovers can experience creations that the sushi bars we frequent can only aspire to.

    While neither sushi nor sashmi, we picked this tasty dish as the one we’d most like to have for Cinco de Mayo:

    A lettuce cup of guacamole, topped with a king’s ransom of lobster.

    We’d also like to have it for Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, and, oh…any day.

    You don’t even need to cook: Just assemble.

    We’re making ours with a garnish of salmon caviar (ikura in Japanese—photo #2). Tobiko or any whitefish caviar (they’re available in several flavors) will do just fine. We’re also making a chunky guacamole, a better texture contrast with the lobster.

    If you’re a really affluent foodie, sturgeon caviar is not discouraged.

    You may notice the plate garnish in the photo includes herbs, spices and a drizzle of flavored olive oil. Plate garnishes add not only color and texture, but extra bits of flavor.

    RECIPE: GUACAMOLE-LOBSTER LETTUCE CUP

  • A lettuce cup, created from pliant butter lettuce (Bibb, Boston)
  • Guacamole: your favorite recipe
  • Lobster meat
  • Lime wedges
  • Plate garnish: black or toasted sesame seeds, citrus zest, minced chives or other green herb (cilantro, parsley), red chili flakes, etc.
  • Optional garnish: caviar of choice*
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    Lobster Guacamole Salad

    Salmon Caviar

    [1] What better topping for guacamole than this creation, from RA Sushi? [2] Salmon caviar, ikura in Japanese (photo courtesy Petrossian).

     
    DRESSINGS

    With flavorful guacamole, you don’t need much more than lime juice as a dressing. But for those who want more:

  • Basil-Jalapeño Dressing
  • Creamy Citrus Dressing
  • Mimosa Dressing (olive oil, champagne, orange juice)
  • Spicy Lemon Dressing
  •  
    A simple drizzle of basil olive oil with fresh lime juice is also delicious.
    ________________

    *Affordable caviar types include capelin (masago in Japanese), flying fish (tobiko in Japanese), lumpfish, salmon, trout or whitefish roe. The latter two are often available flavored, with everything from mango to truffle to wasabi. They are delicious!

      

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