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Archive for March 10, 2016

RECIPE: Guinness BBQ Sauce

Cheeseburger With Potato Skins

Guinness Ribs

Add Guinness stout to your BBQ sauce. Photos and recipe courtesy Tony Roma’s.

 

Tony Roma’s is giving a St. Patrick’s Day twist to ribs and burgers, with Guinness BBQ Sauce.

You don’t need the luck of the Irish to get some: Here’s the recipe, which combines the dark, malty flavors of Ireland’s favorite beer, Guinness stout, with the sweet and savory flavors of good barbecue sauce.

Don’t want to cook? Head to the nearest Tony Roma’s restaurant for Irish Baby Back Ribs and the Irish Burger.

If you don’t need as much sauce, cut back the recipe. Or, gift some to friends and family.

RECIPE: TONY ROMA’S GUINNESS BBQ SAUCE

Ingredients For 2½ Quarts Sauce

  • 1½ quarts ketchup
  • 3 bottles (12 ounces each) Guinness
  • 4 ounces molasses
  • 2 tablespoons minced roasted garlic
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon steak seasoning (see below)
  • 2 ounces apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  •  
    Preparation

  • HEAT the ketchup, Guinness, molasses, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, steak seasoning, vinegar and black pepper over low heat for 12-15 minutes.
  • That’s it!
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    RECIPE: STEAK SEASONING

    You can buy steak seasoning or make your own.
     
    Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 3 tablespoons paprika
  • 2 tablespoons pepper
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1 tablespoon thyme
  •  
    Optional Ingredients

  • Cayenne pepper, cumin, chili powder, mustard powder or whatever you like.
  •  
    Preparation

  • COMBINE the ingredients in a medium bowl; gently whisk together. Store in an airtight jar in a dark place away from heat.
  •  
    To season meat prior to grilling:

  • RUB the steaks, chops or chicken with olive oil; then generously coat with the seasoning prior to grilling.
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    TIP OF THE DAY: Cold-Pressed Juice

    “What is cold-pressed juice,” our aunt asked us recently, “and should I be drinking it instead of Tropicana?”

    While we don’t focus on health foods, we’ll give the topic a bit of attention.

    Cold-pressed juicing has existed for decades among health-food devotées, and generated attention in the 1990s as more sophisticated home juicers came onto the market.

    But it has become much more visible over the last few years as some celebrities (Gwyneth, Kim et al) have publicized their juice fasts for dieting and/or health.

    This engendered the current juicing fad, made more visible by the proliferation of shops and delivery services selling pricey cold-pressed juice. (By the same token, buying produce at retail for pressing juice at home is not inexpensive.)
     
    SHOULD YOU SWITCH TO COLD-PRESSED JUICE?

    If you’re a juice drinker, or are thinking about it, know that there is little scientific evidence to support the claim that cold-pressed juice contains more nutrients than pasteurized juices, or those you could hand-squeeze at home. However, when the juice is unfiltered and cloudy, it indicates a higher level of fiber.

    What is known is that any juice begins to lose nutrients immediately after squeezing, and should consumed quickly if you want to capture every iota of nutrition. Those juices made commercially under high pressure processing (HPP) hold their nutrients longer. Hard-core juicers argue that cold-pressed is better than HPP. Here’s the argument.
     
    PRESSING JUICE AT HOME

    There are two main categories of home juicers:

  • Centrifugal juicers (top photo) have an upright design; the produce food is pushed into a rapidly spinning mesh chamber with sharp teeth on the bottom (like a blender). The teeth shred the produce into a pulp, and the centrifugal motion pulls the juice out of the pulp and through the mesh filter.
  • Masticating juicers (second photo) are horizontal in design and higher in price. Produce is pushed into the top of the tube, where it is crushed and squeezed. Because of the slower crushing and squeezing action, these juicers are better at processing leafy greens and wheatgrass, a limitation of centrifugal juicers. The process extracts more juice in general.
  • Commercially cold-pressed juice (HPP) uses a hydraulic press, crushing the produce under extremely high pressure with cold water to counter the heat generated by the process (heat destroys nutrients; the water does not mix with the juice). This gives the juice a refrigerated shelf life of 30 days or so, compared to only 2 to 4 days for those extracted without high pressure.
  •  
    OUR AFFORDABLE SOLUTION

    Before we had ever heard the term “cold-pressed juice,” we were hooked on a Red Jacket Orchards, a family juice brand produced in New York’s Finger Lakes region that’s delicious, nutritious, unfiltered and affordable.

    They’ve been selling cold-pressed apple juices and blends for 50 years. We’re not a committed juicer; we just love the refreshing flavor as a glass of juice or a cocktail mixer.

    We like every flavor, but are hooked on Joe’s Half & Half.

    The company sells it online; use the store locator to find a retailer near you. Online, three 32-ounce bottles are $31, including shipping.

     

    Centrifugal Juicer

    Masticating Juicer

    Cold Pressed Juice

    Red Jacket Joe's Half & Half

    Top: The Kuvings NJ-9500U Centrifugal Juice Extractor, $149 on Amazon.com. Second: A masticating juicer from Omega, $299.99 at Amazon.com. Third: Cold-pressed juice at Trader Joe’s. Bottom: Red Jacket, a brand that’s been quietly selling cold-pressed juice for 50 years.

     
    That’s a lot more affordable than the 16-ounce bottle of cold-pressed juice at the juice shop on the corner!

      

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