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Archive for January 6, 2016

FOOD FUN: “Stonehenge” Beef Carpaccio

Stonehenge Beef Carpaccio

Garden Beef Carpaccio From All'Onda

Turn beef carpaccio into an homage to
Stonehenge. Photos courtesy All’Onda | NYC.

 

We’re starting the new year of Food Fun with this eye-catching, low calorie treat.

We love the eye appeal of the food at All’Onda in New York City. Take this “Stonehenge” Beef Carpaccio. Cut beets are arranged in a circle in an homage to the giant standing stones of Stonehenge.

Carpaccio (car-POTCH-yo) is a very popular first course in Italy. Paper-thin slices of beef tenderloin are topped with arugula and shaved cheese, traditionally Parmigiano-Reggiano, and a drizzle of olive oil. On top of those basics, the cook can add anything that he/she likes.

So consider what else you’d like to include in your own carpaccio. How about baby spinach, pieces of blood orange, capers or caperberries, cherry or grape tomatoes, gourmet sprouts, onions/green onions/chives, and for those who are blessed financially, white truffles in season (the season is now). The chef at All’Onda chose baby beets and you can, too.
 
For an outside-the-box surf-and-turf, top the beef with anchovies, caviar (salmon caviar is nice and affordable, wasabi tobiko has hot wasabi flavor and a great crunch) or thinly-sliced raw scallops.

The dressing can be fine olive oil or herb-infused oil (basil or rosemary are best) with a slice of lemon or lime. It could be a vinaigrette; or it could be something fusion. We like ponzu sauce, which we used in our re-creation of this recipe.

Serve the carpaccio with sliced baguette or crusty sourdough, plain or toasted, along with a peppermill.

 

RECIPE: STONEHENGE CARPACCIO

Total preparation time is 2 hours 35 minutes, of which two hours is chilling time in the freezer. The biggest challenge you’ll have is slicing the beef thinly and evenly. Sharpen that knife!

Ingredients For 4 Servings

  • 10 ounces beef tenderloin*
  • 2-3 cups handfuls baby arugula (substitute baby spinach)
  • EVOO (we used basil-infused) or balsamic vinaigrette
  • Baby beets in red and yellow, sliced to stand up
  • Kosher salt
  • Minced chives and/or small capers
  • Shaved Parmesan or Pecorino Romano cheese†
  •  
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    *Get the the tip end of the loin, which is narrower and a better shape for carpaccio.

    †American “Romano” cheese is a mild cheese not related to Italian Peorino Romano, which is salty and flavorful like Parmigiano-Reggiano. See our Cheese Glossary for more information.

     

    Preparation

    1. FREEZE the beef briefly to make it easier to cut. Cloak it tightly with plastic wrap and place it in the freezer for 2 hours. Chill the plates in the refrigerator.

    2. REMOVE the beef from the freezer and thinly slice it into pieces approximately 1/8″ to 1/4″ thick. Lay out sheets of plastic wrap and place each slice onto the wrap as you slice it. Top the slices with another piece of plastic wrap and gently pound the meat with a mallet until the slices are paper thin.

    3. DIVIDE the beef onto the four plates, creating a neat circle or other artful layout. Toss the greens lightly in the balsamic vinaigrette. Arrange the beets into “Stonehenge.” pepper and/or

    4. TOP with the shaved cheese and serve, passing the peppermill and the bread.
     

    CARPACCIO VS. CRUDO

    Sometimes we see “Tuna Carpaccio” or other seafood carpaccio (octopus, salmon, scallops, etc.) on a menu. That’s incorrect; feel free to point it out to the chef. (Seriously: We once had to tell a two-star chef, via our waiter, that his menu featured bison, not buffalo).

     

    Carpaccio Recipe

    Don’t want to create Stonehenge? The same ingredients make a conventional beef carpaccio. This one, from Firenze Osteria, is slightly less conventional: It substitutes aïoli—garlic mayonnaise—for the olive oil.

     
    Just because they’re acclaimed doesn’t mean that they’re correct.)

    Carpaccio is raw beef filet, typically sirloin; crudo is the term for raw fish or seafood. Crudo is analogous to sashimi or tiradito, but the fish is cut differently.

    While crudo has been eaten for millennia*, carpaccio is a modern dish, created in Venice in 1963, at the time of an exhibition dedicated to Venetian painter Vittore Carpaccio (1465-1526).

    The carpaccio dish was based on the Piedmont speciality, carne cruda all’albese, created by Giuseppe Cipriani, founder of Harry’s Bar in Venice. Using fine Piedmontese beef (Piemontese in Italian), he originally prepared it for a countess whose doctors had recommended that she eat raw meat!
     
    _________________________________________
    ‡From the earliest times, fishermen have eaten their catch on board, with a bit of salt and/or citrus. Before man learned to make fire, some 350,000 years ago, the catch was de facto eaten raw. Here’s a list of raw fish dishes.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Quick Microwaved Mug-Scrambled Eggs

    Mug Scrambled Eggs

    Mug-scrambled eggs, ready in less than three minutes. Photo courtesy American
    Egg Board.

     

    You should start the day off with a protein-based breakfast. Many of us don’t, opting for toast, a bagel or a bowl of Corn Flakes. Yet, you can have a better-for-you breakfast of scrambled eggs, without turning on the stove.

    For a quick and easy breakfast in less than 3 minutes, try this microwave egg scramble from the American Egg Board, IncredibleEgg.org.

    Just toss the ingredients into a mug! Prep time is 1 minute, cook time is 2 minutes. You can even prepare the mixture the night before, cutting your morning time to

    To blend the ingredients, you’ll need a mini whisk or an Aerolatte or other milk frother. However, in a pinch, a fork will do.

    RECIPE: MICROWAVED MUG SCRAMBLED EGGS

    Ingredients Per Serving

  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • Optional: minced fresh or dried herbs
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional garnishes: 2 tablespoons shredded Cheddar cheese
    or salsa
  • Preparation

    1. COAT a 12-ounce, microwave-safe coffee mug with cooking spray. Add the eggs, milk, herbs and salt and pepper to taste; beat or whisk until blended.

    2. MICROWAVE on HIGH 45 seconds; stir. MICROWAVE until eggs are almost set, 30 to 45 seconds longer. Note: Microwave ovens vary. Cooking times may need to be adjusted.

    3. TOP with cheese and/or salsa; season with salt and pepper.

     
      

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    RECIPE: Baked Cabbage Chips

    We over-kaled last year. We couldn’t escape it: It seemed as if every restaurant entrée we ordered came with kale. We made too many kale chips as “better for you” snacks.

    Now we’re on a kale moratorium, and were happy to discover that you can also make chips from kale’s cruciferous cousin, cabbage. The recipe is from our favorite gourmet grocer, Good Eggs in San Francisco.

    RECIPE: CABBAGE CHIPS

    Ingredients

  • 1 head green cabbage
  • Olive oil
  • Coarse sea salt
  • Red chile flakes or caraway seeds
  • Optional: yogurt-dill dip
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT the oven to 225°F. Line two baking sheets with wire racks; parchment is fine if you don’t have racks.

    2. CUT the cabbage into quarters and discard the tough outermost leaves. Carefully remove the innermost leaves and spread them on the baking sheets/racks in a single layer.

    3. DRIZZLE or brush the leaves lightly with olive oil and use a brush (or your fingers) to spread the oil over the front and back of each leaf.

    4. BAKE for about 90 minutes, until the cabbage is crispy and golden brown. Remove from the oven and season with salt and chile flakes. Eat immediately or store in the fridge in an airtight container.

    5. MAKE the optional yogurt dip. Blend nonfat Greek yogurt with dill, optional minced garlic and salt to taste. Or, substitute curry powder for the dill.

     

    Cabbage Chips

    Green Cabbage

    Cabbage is the new kale chip. It’s one of the lowest-priced fresh vegetables. Photos courtesy Good Eggs.

     
    THE CRUCIFEROUS VEGETABLES FAMILY

    Your healthcare providers want you to eat more cruciferous veggies.

    Cruciferous vegetables—also known as brassicas—are superfoods that comprise the Brassicaceae family of vegetables. These nutritional powerhouses are also packed with cancer-fighting* phytonutrients, powerful antioxidants.

    The family includes arugula, bok choy, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, horseradish, kale, kohlrabi, mizuna, mustard greens, radish, rapeseed/canola, rapini (broccoli rabe), rutabaga, tatsoi and turnips.

    Eat up: They’re low in calories and high in fiber, vitamins and minerals. Consume them raw or lightly steamed to get the maximum amount of antioxidants. Just don’t overcook them! You can eat overcooked carrots or potatoes; overcooked broccoli and Brussels sprouts are not so pleasant.

    “Cruciferous” derives from cruciferae, New Latin for “cross-bearing.” It is so named because the flowers of these vegetables consist of four petals in the shape of a cross.

    Here’s a book you may enjoy: Brassicas: Cooking the World’s Healthiest Vegetables: Kale, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts and More.
     
    *Studies have shown the ability of cruciferous vegetables to stop the growth of cancer cells in the breast, cervix, colon, uterus, liver, lung and prostate.

      

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