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Archive for January 13, 2015

RECIPE: Savory Squash Cobbler With Cheddar Chive Biscuits

squash-cobbler-goboldwbutter-230r

The cobbler biscuits look familiar, but
underneath is a savory vegetable blend
instead of sweet fruit. Photo courtesy Go
Bold With Butter.

 

We never even thought of a savory cobbler before seeing this recipe from Taylor Takes a Taste on GoBoldWith Butter.com.

A cobbler is a fruit dish cooked in a casserole. Shortcake batter or biscuit dough is dropped onto the fruit before baking. The dish got its name because the lumps of cooked dough resembled cobblestones.

So it’s a short leap to substitute vegetables for the fruit and have a delicious savory cobbler.

You don’t have to wait for the warm weather to make this Summer Squash Cobbler. It makes a great side dish for a weekday family meal or a large gathering. You can add optional chicken, ham, tofu or other protein cubes.

In the original recipe, zucchini, yellow squash, and sweet summer corn are sautéed with onions and tossed with Parmesan cheese. You can substitute winter vegetables in the off season.

This delicious filling is then topped with a layer of buttery cheddar and chive biscuits. Any leftovers are delicious the next day.

For this recipe, prep time is 30 minutes, cook time is 1 hour, 10 minutes

 
RECIPE: SUMMER SQUASH COBBLER

Ingredients For 8 Servings

For The Squash Mixture

  • 5 cups chopped zucchini (bite size pieces)
  • 5 cups chopped yellow squash (bite size pieces)
  • 2 cups fresh corn kernels (you can substitute something else when corn is not in season—edamame, lima beans, peas, etc.)
  • 3/4 cups chopped Vidalia or other sweet onion
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus extra for casserole pan
  • 2 tablespoons chicken stock
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon coarse ground pepper
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2 tablespoons all purpose flour
  • Optional: 2 cups cubed ham or other protein
  •  
    For The Biscuits

  • 4 cups self-rising flour
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 cups grated white cheddar cheese
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives
  • 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 cups buttermilk
  •  

    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT oven to 400°degrees. Butter a 9×13 casserole dish. Set aside.

    2. MELT melt 4 tablespoons of butter in large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add onions and cook, stirring frequently, until onions are soft. Raise heat to medium high and add zucchini and yellow squash. Stirring constantly, cook squash for 5 minutes.

    2. ADD corn, chicken stock, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Reduce heat to medium and cook vegetables, stirring frequently for 5 minutes. Remove vegetables from heat and let them cool to room temperature. While vegetables are cooling…

    3. MAKE the biscuit dough. Place the self-rising flour in large bowl. Add the cayenne pepper. Stir until flour mixture is well blended. Cut cold butter into 16 pieces and add to flour mixture. Using pastry blender or two forks, cut butter into flour until it resembles coarse meal. Add grated cheese and chives to flour mixture and stir until well mixed.

    4. MAKE a well in the center of the flour. Add 1-1/2 cups of buttermilk and pull the flour from sides of bowl toward the center. Stir until dough starts to form. If the mixture seems too dry, add additional buttermilk.

     

    camouflage-zucchini-burpee-basket-230

    Pretty camouflage zucchini. The seeds are available from Burpee.com. Photo courtesy Burpee.

     

    5. KNEAD the dough in the bowl for 2 or 3 turns until a ball forms. Remove dough from bowl and place on floured surface. Pat dough out into a rectangle that is about 1/2-inch thick. Let the dough rest for a moment while preparing cobbler filling.

    6. MIX the Parmesan cheese and flour together in small bowl. Add the Parmesan mixture to the cooled squash mixture and stir to blend. Empty the squash filling into prepared casserole pan, smoothing into even layer.

    7. CUT the biscuit dough into circles. Place the biscuits on surface of squash so that edges of biscuits are just touching each other.

    8. BAKE the cobbler at 400°F for 15 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350°F and continue baking for 20 to 30 minutes, until squash is soft. Cover the top of the cobbler with foil if the biscuits begin to brown too much.

    9. REMOVE the casserole from oven and let cool for 10 minutes. Serve.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: 10 Global Foods To Try This Year

    causa-perudelifhts-230

    Causa: humble mashed potatoes are
    transformed into a snazzy appetizer or side.
    Photo courtesy PeruDelights.com.

     

    For more than 15 years, the magazine Flavor & The Menu has been the trusted authority on flavor trends for food and beverage menu developers. Here’s their list of 10 items from around the world that are “primed for carrying a new wave of global flavors” in 2015.

    You don’t have to wait for your local restaurants to feature these foods. You can find recipes online and be the trendsetter in your area.

    Bobo Chicken From China

    Like food on a stick? Not to be confused with the Brazilian dish, Chicken Bobó, this spicy snack and street food comprises skewers of chicken, often with vegetables, are marinated in sauces teeming with Sichuan peppers, grilled, then served at room temperature. It can be plated at home without the skewers, with rice or noodle. Here’s more.
     
    Causa From Peru

    Love potatoes? This popular potato dish, served cold or room temperature, is composed of mashed potatoes, sometimes seasoned with lime, onion and chiles, stuffed with various ingredients, then formed into cakes or terrines. Here’s a recipe from PeruDelights.com.

     
    Cemita From Mexico

    This torta from Puebla, Mexico, is a sandwich on a brioche-like roll that is also called cemita. The sandwich is filled with avocado, meat (carnitas, beef Milanesa and pulled pork are popular) plus a fresh white cheese like panela. Here’s a recipe.

     

    Feijoada From Brazil

    If there’s a Brazilian restaurant in your area, it most likely serves feijoada, pronounced fay-ZHWAH-dah. The national dish of Brazil is a rich, smoky stew of black beans, salted pork, bacon, smoked pork ribs, sausage and jerked beef. It’s a one-bowl, comfort-food meal. You can make it at home and serve with sides like fried plantains, hot pepper sauce, pork rinds and stewed greens. Here’s a recipe.
     
    Medianoche From Cuba

    A variation of the popular Cubano pork sandwich, the Medianoche (which means “midnight,” as it was a snack that followed a night of dancing) switches out the crusty French bread for a soft, sweet, yellow egg dough bread. It’s often smaller than the typical Cuban sandwich. It’s easy to make: Just combine roast pork, ham, Swiss cheese, sliced pickles and mustard on sweet Cuban bread (no lettuce, no tomato, no mayo!). Here’s the recipe.

     

    Okonomiyaki from Japan

    These savory pancakes are typically made with white flour, grated yam and dashi. Toppings and batters can vary but generally stay on the savory side. Examples include shrimp, green onion and pickled vegetables. The name is a combination of okonomi, “what you like” or “what you want” and yaki, meaning grilled or cooked. Here’s a recipe.
     
    Paratha From India

    Available at any Indian restaurant, this unleavened flatbread from India is traditionally pan-fried. It can be eaten plain, like any flatbread; but it is popularly turned into the Indian version of a knish, filled with boiled potatoes, vegetables, radishes or paneer cheese. Crisp, flaky and endlessly customizable, here’s a recipe.
     
    Piada From Italy

    Also called piadina, this Italian street food, originally from the Emilia-Romagna region, is a thin flatbread that serves as a wrap for fillings: cheeses, cold cuts and vegetables as well as with sweet fillings such as jam or Nutella. Here’s a recipe.

     

    popiah-spring-roll-rasamalaysia-230

    Popiah, a Malaysian spring roll. Photo courtesy Rasa Malaysia.

     

    Popiah From Malaysia

    Malaysia’s answer to the fresh spring roll, the popiah has a thin wrapping, often made with tapioca flour and egg, that is rolled around a variety fillings (shrimp, jicama and fried shallots are popular). Dipping sauces range from sweet to spicy to savory. In mainland China, Singapore, Malaysia and Taiwan there are home-based popiah parties, where the ingredients are laid out and guests roll their own popiah to their own personal liking. Spring roll lovers: This one’s for you. Here’s a recipe.
     
    Simit From Turkey

    A kind of Turkish sesame bagel—but so much more intensely sesame—the simit is a ring of chewy dough that’s perfect for breakfast. In Turkey, it’s purchased as a street food on the way to work or during the day as a snack bread. In the U.S., it’s been turned into a base for sandwiches (see our simit article and the difference between simits and bagels). Here’s a recipe.

    Here’s the full article, with many more ideas on how to enjoy these global delights.

      

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