THE NIBBLE BLOG: Products, Recipes & Trends In Specialty Foods
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Archive for January 5, 2015

PRODUCT: Boxed Water Is Better

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Boxed Water offers grab-and-go convenience with a smaller carbon footprint. Photo courtesy Boxed Water.

 

If your 2015 goals include drinking more water, our first tip would be to purchase a refillable water bottle. You’ll save money and save the environment in the process. Millions of plastic bottles go into U.S. landfills each year.

Second choice: Boxed Water, an alternative to bottled water that decreases dependence on non-renewable resources, reduces waste and decreases the carbon footprint. The company fills milk carton-type boxes instead of plastic or glass bottles.

The Boxed Water container is far more sustainable than plastic bottled water. About 76% of the box is from a renewable resource, trees. The trees used to make the boxes come from certified, well managed forests. These forests remain healthy and stable through ongoing replanting while helping to remove CO2 from the atmosphere.

The cardboard boxes are easily recyclable, and are shipped flat to the filling plant, which is significantly more fuel-efficient compared to shipping empty plastic or glass bottles.

 

The company uses local water sources—no shipping of water cross-country or across the seas, with a big carbon footprint. The water is purified via reverse osmosis and carbon filtering.

The rectangular shape reduces shipping waste and carbon footprint versus round bottles.

Finally, the company has partnered with 1% For The Planet to help with world water relief, reforestation, and environmental protection projects to help enable a positive impact on humanitarian and environmental efforts. That’s water for thought in 2015!

Boxed Water is currently available in more than 6,000 stores in the U.S. with growing distribution in Canada and Mexico. For more information visit BoxedWaterIsBetter.com.

 
  

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TIP OF THE DAY: Switch To Olive Oil

Here’s a New Year’s resolution that isn’t tough to keep: Switch from olive oil to butter for your everyday fat.

You’ve been hearing it for 10 years: olive oil is a heart healthy fat. Here’s what the Harvard School Of Public Health has to say:

It’s time to end the low-fat myth. That’s because the percentage of calories from fat that you eat, whether high or low, isn’t really linked with disease. What really matters is the type of fat you eat.

  • Choose foods with healthy fats, limit foods high in saturated fat, and avoid foods with trans fat.
  • “Good” fats—monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats—lower disease risk. Foods high in good fats include vegetable oils (such as olive, canola, sunflower, soy, and corn), nuts, seeds and fish.
  • “Bad” fats—saturated and, especially, trans fats—increase disease risk. Foods high in bad fats include red meat, butter, cheese, and ice cream, as well as processed foods made with trans fat from partially hydrogenated oil.
  • And if you have lactose sensitivity, remember that butter is dairy.

       

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    The choice is yours, but make the right choice. Photo courtesy Olive Oil Emporium.

     

    In 2004, the FDA allowed this health claim:

    “Limited and not conclusive scientific evidence suggests that eating about 2 tablespoons (23 grams) of olive oil daily may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease due to the monounsaturated fat in olive oil. To achieve this possible benefit, olive oil is to replace a similar amount of saturated fat and not increase the total number of calories you eat in a day.”

    Last year, researchers at Glasgow University in Scotland suggested that two teaspoons (20 ml) per day of extra virgin olive oil for 6 weeks “would be enough to see beneficial effects for the heart.”

     

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    Dip bread in olive oil instead of spreading it with butter. Use a more flavorful EVOO, and add seasonings—herbs, pepper, salt, spices—as well as a splash of balsamic vinegar if you like. Photo courtesy FlavorYourLife.com.

     

    NUTRITIONAL COMPARISON: OLIVE OIL VS. BUTTER

  • Butter: 100 calories per tablespoon, 12 grams fat, 7 grams saturated fat, 3 grams monounsaturated fat. 31mg cholesterol, 82 mg sodium.
  • Olive Oil: 120 calories per tablespoon, 14 grams fat, 2 grams saturated fats, 12 grams healthy fats, 0 mg cholesterol, 0 mg sodium.
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    Breads, eggs, grains, meat and poultry, popcorn and just about anything cooked with butter can all be cooked in, or accented with, heart-healthy oils instead.

    If you miss the flavor of butter, transition away from it by cooking in oil and finishing the dish by adding a small amount of butter at the end.

    You don’t need to cook with extra virgin olive oil: The heat destroys the delicate flavors that you pay for. Instead of EVOO, look to virgin olive oil or what is known as ordinary olive oil—the major supermarket brands like Bertolli and Filippo Berio. Here are the different grades of olive oil.

    Do, however, use EVOO as a garnish: toss it with pasta, rice and vegetables; use it as a bread dipper. Select olive oils with the flavor profile you prefer—fruity, herbal, peppery, etc. (Alas, since flavor information is rarely on the label, you need to experiment or get recommendations from your retailer.)

    Use the appropriate grade of olive oil for different types of food preparation.

     

    WHAT ABOUT BAKING?

    We use butter for cakes and cookies, because our palate wants butteriness in those foods. But, as everyone who follows the cake mix directions to mix the dry ingredients with olive oil, oils work just fine. Unless you want the flavor of olive oil (Italian olive oil cakes are delicious!), use a neutral oil like canola.

    While you won’t get buttery flavor with oil, it does produce a moist cake, which tends to be be lighter and taller than a cake made with butter. The texture is is a bit more coarse and the crumb is more open (less dense).

    Butter produces shorter, more compact cakes, with a finer texture and a smaller crumb due. The texture will be a bit creamier, and of course it sports that rich, buttery taste.

    Here’s a conversion chart for baking, courtesy of Castillo de Piñar, which has many tips for cooking with olive oil:
    butter-olive-oil-conversion-chart-castillodepinar

      

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