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Archive for October 25, 2014

TIP OF THE DAY: Apple Cider Donuts

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Fresh, warm donuts with an apple cider
glaze. Photo courtesy Karo Syrup.

 

On Thursday we purchased an apple cider donut at our local farmers market. It was just OK, with no detectable hint of apple cider. So we went home, got out the recipe file and made our own with a recipe from Karo Syrup.

That’s the difference between these and the one we purchased: corn syrup and apple cider combine for a delicious glaze.

Prep time is 35 minutes, rest time is 45 to 60 minutes. You can fry them or bake them (bake time is an additional 15 minutes).

RECIPE: APPLE CIDER DONUTS

Ingredients For 15 Doughnuts

  • 3-1/4 to 3-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 envelopes Fleischmann’s RapidRise Yeast
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons milk
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 3 egg yolks
  • Corn oil for frying

For The Apple Cider Glaze

  • 1 cup apple cider
  • 2 cups powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon light corn syrup

 

Preparation

1. COMBINE 2 cups flour, undissolved yeast, sugar, salt and cinnamon in a large mixer bowl.

2. HEAT milk and butter to very warm (120°F to 130°F). Add to flour mixture with egg yolks; beat for 2 minutes at low speed. Continue adding flour until a soft dough forms.

3. KNEAD on a lightly floured surface until smooth and elastic (4 to 6 minutes). Cover and let rest for 10 minutes.

4. ROLL out the dough on a lightly floured counter into a 12-inch circle, about 1/2-inch thick. Using a 3-inch cookie or biscuit cutter, cut out as many rounds as possible. Cut out the centers with a 1-inch cookie cutter (or poke a hole through the center with your finger).

5. PLACE the doughnuts 2 to 3 inches apart on a lightly greased or parchment lined baking sheet. Re-roll and cut the remaining dough. Cover the doughnuts and let rise for 45 minutes to 1 hour.

6. TO FRY: Heat at least 2 inches of oil to 350°F in a deep fryer or deep pan. Fry 2 to 3 doughnuts at a time, turning occasionally until well browned, about 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from oil and drain on paper towels. TO BAKE: Preheat the oven to 375°F. Bake the risen doughnuts for 8 to 10 minutes. FOR BOTH: Cool a few minutes, then transfer to wire rack.

 

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Light corn syrup. Photo courtesy ACH Food Companies.

 
7. MAKE the glaze: Boil the apple cider in a small saucepan until reduced by half, 7 to 10 minutes. Place the powdered sugar in medium bowl. Whisk in the hot cider and corn syrup until smooth.

8. GLAZE: Drizzle the donuts with the apple cider glaze or, using tongs, dunk the doughnuts into the glaze. Serve warm.
 
Enjoy the donuts warm, with a hot cup of coffee or a cool glass of milk or apple cider.
 
CORN SYRUP VERSUS HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Corn syrup and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) are two different sweeteners. The latter is a sweeter form of corn syrup made from corn starch. It is 20% cheaper and easier to transport than sugar; hence, a more profitable sweetener for manufacturers to use. The process was developed in the 1970s and introduced widely into American processed foods in the 1980s. Here’s more about high fructose corn syrup.

Corn syrup, called glucose syrup outside the U.S. and Canada because it is composed mainly of glucose, is made from corn starch. It was invented in 1812 by a German chemist, Gottlieb Kirchhoff, and has long been used to sweeten soft drinks, ice cream, ketchup, breads and many other mass-produced foods. Before commercial brands (Karo Light and Dark Corn Syrup products were introduced in 1902), housewives would carry their syrup jugs to the grocery store to be filled from the barrel.

Light corn syrup is almost clear, with a delicate flavor; dark corn syrup has a more pronounced, molasses-like flavor. They can be used interchangeably in most recipes.

Corn syrup is a good product that is often confused with the highly processed high fructose corn syrup. The best manufacturers use it in because corn syrup doesn’t crystallize and turn grainy in cold temperatures. It thus keeps a good consistency for products like fudge and caramel sauces and and candies. In mass production, baked goods made with corn syrup are moister and stay fresher longer than those made with sugar.
 
CHECK OUT THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF SWEETENERS IN OUR SUGAR & SWEETENERS GLOSSARY.

  

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