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Archive for March 26, 2014

TIP OF THE DAY: Try Arrope

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Arrope syrup. There’s also an arrope
preserve with pumpkin (see photo below).
Photo courtesy Miel de Palma.

 

Arrope (ah-ROE-pay), a cooking and condiment syrup, is a product that few of us have in our kitchens. Yet, if you’re a serious cook (or eater), it’s an ingredient you should know about.

If your parents are serious cooks/eaters, it’s an idea for a Mother’s Day or Father’s Day gift—so much tastier than another scarf or tie.

And if no one cooks, there’s a delicious arrope pumpkin preserve, a recipe that derives from the ancient use of arrope to preserve or stew fruits. The pumpkin is cooked in the arrope until it is candied. It’s delicious as a sweet-and-earthy bread spread or a condiment with creamy goat’s or sheep’s milk cheeses (see photo below).

In fact, when you go to purchase arrope, you need to be specific. Otherwise, you can easily be sold the preserve instead of the syrup, or vice versa. Tip: If the word “pumpkin” appears, it’s the preserve.

WHAT IS ARROPE

A reduction of grape must, arrope is a condiment that dates to ancient Rome, where it was called defrutum or sapa. It survives as a gourmet Spanish condiment. The name comes from the Arabic word rubb, syrup.

 
Arrope is closely related to saba (also called sapa, mosto d’uva cotto and vin cotto). This group comprises ancient precursors to “modern” balsamic vinegar, which appeared in the 11th century.

So if you’re a balsamic vinegar fan, chances are good that you’ll be happy to discover arrope.

 

Like honey* and saba, in the days before sugar was widely available arrope was used to add sweetness. Today it is used in everything from drinks to salad dressings to sauces to desserts (try it with fruit salad or drizzled over ice cream). We use it as a glaze for roast poultry and meats. It easily substitutes in cooking for sweet wines such as sherry and marsala.

As civilization embraced massed-produced foods over artisan products in the latter half of the 20th century, the craft of making arrope—which involves carefully cooking down the must into a syrup over a period of weeks—has almost disappeared. It survives among a handful of artisan producers, carrying on family traditions. (Before modern times, arrope was made by the cook of the family.)

In Spain, the few remaining artisans produce arrope syrup (grape must reduction) and preserved pumpkin.

While it’s no leap to combine arrope in Spanish recipes, you can port it over to any cuisine—just as with Italy’s saba and France’s verjus.

 

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A Spanish cheese plate with typical condiments: fig cake, fresh figs, and in the back, a bowl of arrope preserve with candied pumpkin.

 
*Honey is sweet and syrupy straight from the hive (or straight from the hive and pasteurized). Arrope and saba are cooked to develop sweet-and-sour flavors including notes of cooked caramel.
 
HOW ARROPE IS MADE

It starts with a large quantity of grape must, freshly pressed grape juice that still contains all of the skins and seeds and stems. The must is very flavorful with high levels of sugar.

  • The fresh-pressed grape juice can be strained and sold as verjus, where it is used instead of citrus juice or vinegar.
  • Or, it can be cooked down into arrope or saba.
  • To make arrope, the must is boiled until the volume is reduced by at least 50%, and its viscosity is reduced to a thick syrup. There is no added sugar or pectin.
  • Saba is similarly boiled down into a syrup.
  •  
    Ready to try it? Check at your local specialty food market or order it online:

  • Arrope syrup (grape must reduction)
  • Arrope with pumpkin (preserve)
  •   

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    RECIPE: Kalamata Olive Bread

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    Kalamata olives baked in a tasty loaf. Photo courtesy Pompeian.

     

    If you love olives, you’ll love olive bread. We’re lucky: Our neighborhood bakery typically has fresh-baked loaves. If you’re not so lucky, you can make your own.

    The loaves freeze nicely, so make more than one. A homemade loaf of bread also makes a nice house gift when you’re invited for dinner.

    This recipe is courtesy Pompeian, which uses its Pompeian Extra Virgin Olive Oil in the recipe.

    RECIPE: KALAMATA OLIVE BREAD

    Ingredients For One 1-3/4 Pound Loaf

  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1/4 teaspoon raw granulated sugar
  • 2-3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup pitted black oil-cured olives such as Kalamata or
    Picholine, coarsely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 3/4 teaspoon dry active yeast
  • 2/3 cup cold water
  • 1-1/2 teaspoon salt
  •  

    Preparation

    1. COMBINE the warm water, yeast and sugar in a 2-cup liquid measuring cup and let sit for 15 minutes or until the mixture starts to bubble.

    2. FIT food processor with the dough blade. Combine the flour and salt in the bowl. With the machine running, add the liquid ingredients slowly through the feed tube and process until the dough forms a ball. Continue processing for another 30 seconds.

    3. TRANSFER the dough to a floured wooden surface and flatten slightly into a disc. Top with the olives, roll up and form into a ball. Place the ball in a large, lightly oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour before using.
    Variations

    4. TURN dough out onto lightly floured surface and round it into a smooth ball, pulling excess dough underneath and pinching to form a tight seal. Return dough to oiled bowl, cover loosely and let rise until doubled in size and the dough spring backs slowly to the touch, about 1 hour.

    5. PREHEAT oven to 425°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

     

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    Kalamata olives. Photo by Corey Lugg | THE NIBBLE.

     

    6. TURN the dough out, seam side down, onto prepared baking sheet. Brush the bread lightly with water and cut a shallow X into the top of the loaf. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until well browned and loaf sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom. Let cool completely on a wire rack before serving.

    BAKE AHEAD OPTION

    This bread can be made well ahead of time and reheated in 300°F oven.

    It can also be frozen successfully:

  • Wrap the bread in aluminum foil and then in a freezer storage bag; place in the freezer.
  • When ready to serve, remove the bread from the bag, open the foil slightly and place in a 350°F oven for 10 to 15 minutes or until heated through.
  •  
    Enjoy the bread plain or dipped in olive oil!

      

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