THE NIBBLE BLOG: Products, Recipes & Trends In Specialty Foods
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Archive for August 18, 2013

PRODUCT: belVita Breakfast Biscuits, Soft Baked

belVita Soft Baked breakfast biscuit in
Mixed Berry. Photo courtesy Nabisco.

 

In various surveys, fewer than half of Americans report eating breakfast every day—even though studies show that breakfast eaters can benefit from improved concentration during the morning, a positive impact on managing body weight and other advantages.

That’s why Nabisco launched belVita Breakfast Biscuits last year. A better grab-and-go alternative, the flavorful, whole-grain biscuits are delicious with coffee, tea or a yogurt. They earned their place as a NIBBLE Top Pick Of The Week.

The whole-grain biscuits are meant to be part of a balanced breakfast, along with a serving of lowfat dairy and fruit, such as:

  • Apple slices and lowfat cheese
  • Banana and a nonfat latte
  • Fresh strawberries and nonfat Greek yogurt
  • Smoothie made with lowfat Greek yogurt and frozen blueberries
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    But even if all you do is munch on belVita with your coffee, you’ll be ahead of the game—if your game consists of a less nutritious, higher calorie bagel, danish, muffin or other carb. belVita Breakfast Biscuits are portioned in convenient, individual packs that make grab-and-go easy and control your portion size.

     

    Now, the original crunchy biscuits have been joined by Soft Baked.

    Personally, we prefer the original crunchy biscuits—we love to crunch. But those who like a muffin in the morning should opt for the Soft Baked. They’re similar to a muffin consistency, rolled flat in the shape of a bar, in:

  • Mixed Berry
  • Oats & Chocolate
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    One biscuit, a 1.76 ounce/50 g serving, contains 20% of your daily value of fiber (11 g per serving), 180 (Mixed Berry) or 200 (Oats & Chocolate) calories and 7 g fat.

     

    Boxes of the two Soft Baked biscuit* flavors. Photo courtesy Nabisco.

     

    The line is certified kosher (dairy) by OU and is carried by supermarkets and other retailers nationwide.
     

    *Having said “biscuit” more times in this article than we typically say in a year, we can’t sign off without offering for your amusement the biscuit tongue twister of our youth. Say this three times quickly:

    A box of biscuits.
    A box of mixed biscuits.
    A biscuit mixer.

      

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    TIP OF THE DAY: Parchment Paper Vs. Waxed Paper

    Cookies on parchment paper. Photo courtesy
    King Arthur.

     

    We’ve gotten a few inquiries about waxed paper versus parchment paper. The easiest way to remember which to use is that wax melts when it’s near heat. So:

  • Parchment paper can take the heat. It’s coated with silicone, which is nonstick and heat-resistant.
  • Waxed paper can’t take the heat. The soybean or paraffin wax surface will melt and can even catch fire!
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    For some tasks you can use either.

    WHEN TO USE PARCHMENT PAPER

  • Baking. Most brands can withstand temperatures up to 420°F for up to 30 minutes. (For higher-heat and longer baking, check the package to be sure.) Popular uses include lining cookie sheets instead of greasing them. This also keeps grease from fragile cookies like meringues.
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  • Cooking. The most popular use is “en papillote,” a technique of wrapping food in a pouch of parchment paper before baking. It locks in flavor and keeps the moisture in as it steams the fish and other foods—a low calorie preparation. You can also microwave leftover pizza on a piece of parchment to help crisp the bottom.
  • Lining. The elegant-looking parchment can be used instead of a napkin.
  • Serving. Restaurants use it to present cones of French fries and other fried foods. You can also use it to serve popcorn and other snacks. Use a piece of tape to seal the cone.
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    Don’t use parchment in the broiler: It can catch fire. Use foil instead.

    Parchment paper can be purchased in rolls or in precut sheets that fit different size baking pans. There are two “grades”: the original silicon-treated parchment and a newer, much cheaper variety treated with Quilon. The Quilon parchment has a lower heat tolerance, but is fine for most baking needs.

    Some bakers use Silpat: washable, reusable silicon pan liners. They’re great for some needs, but don’t give cookies the crispiness they need on the bottom.

     

    WHEN TO USE WAXED PAPER

    Wax paper was designed to repel moisture. It was first invented to keep bags of potato chips from getting soggy.

  • Covering. When slicing raw meats, lay a sheet of wax paper atop the cutting board to keep the surface sanitary.
  • Lining. Line the produce drawers of the fridge, and you won’t have to remove and wash the entire bin as often. Similarly, you can use it to line kitchen drawers.
  • Mixing. Here’s a baking tip: Mix the dry ingredients on a sheet of wax paper on the counter. Lift it to form a funnel and easily transfer the ingredients into the mixer bowl.
  • Dustbuster. Mom’s favorite use: Place wax paper on top of the upper kitchen cabinets where dust and grease accumulate. Every few months, change the paper.
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    WHEN TO USE EITHER

  • Dripping. Catch the drips from candy apples, chocolates and other foods that “drip dry.”
  • Pouring. Roll the paper to make a funnel/cone.
  • Separating. Layer squares of paper between burgers, steaks, or chops before freezing. It will be easier to separate them for thawing.
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    Caramel apples on wax paper. Photo by Karcich | IST.

     

  • Separating. Separate burger patties or other foods prior to cooking.
  • Wrapping. While waxed paper works for longer periods to keep the moisture in, you can use either for cheese, meats, sandwiches, etc.
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    WAXED PAPER VS. WAX PAPER

    Since the product is made from unbleached paper that’s coated with wax, the proper name is waxed paper.

    “Wax paper” would imply that the sheet is made of wax.

      

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    TOP PICK OF THE WEEK: Jif Whips Peanut Butter & Chocolate Spread

    Style your own cookies with Jif Whips. Photo
    by Elvira Kalviste | THE NIBBLE.

     

    We focus on specialty foods, so rarely name a mass-marketed supermarket product as a Top Pick.

    But Jif’s new Whipped Peanut Butter & Chocolate spread is just so yummy, special and, well, welcome, that it takes this week’s top honors.

    Everyone who loves peanut butter cups should run out and buy a tub, possibly several.

    The whipped PB spread, which also includes an unsweetened Creamy Peanut Butter variety, is spreadable, dippable, mixable, pipeable, frostable and topable.

    If you don’t want to do any of those things, just dip a spoon into the tub and enjoy!

    Read the full review.

     
    FIND MORE OF OUR FAVORITE PEANUT BUTTER BRANDS.

     

      

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