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Archive for July 5, 2013

TIP OF THE DAY: Save The Sauerkraut Juice & A Bacon Sauerkraut Recipe

We have a delicious recipe for bacon sauerkraut below, but first a tip: Don’t toss the sauerkraut juice. Not only is it good for you*; if you like the taste of sauerkraut, the juice has the identical flavor.

Drink It

Drinking sauerkraut juice may sound strange to Americans, but it is a popular digestif and tonic in Belgium, Germany, Scandinavia and elsewhere. You can drink it:

  • As a glass of juice or a shot
  • In a vodka cocktail
  • As a sparkler mixed with club soda
  •  

    We enjoy drinking a small glass of sauerkraut juice as we eat the sauerkraut itself: with brats, franks, pork loin, etc.

    And if you have a store throat, some people swear that sauerkraut juice is the cure (and much tastier than gargling with salt water).

     

    Eat the sauerkraut, drink the juice. Photo © Viktorija | Fotolia.

     
    Cook With It

  • Cooking/steaming water: Steam brats in the juice.
  • Marinades: The acids in sauerkraut juice are tenderizers, and great in marinades for pork and poultry. Use it instead of vinegar.
  • Slow cooking: Add the juice to pork and apples in a slow cooker, or to soups and stews where you’d like a hint of tart and tangy.
  • Vinaigrette: Replace the vinegar with sauerkraut juice. Add a clove of crushed fresh garlic.
  •  
    The bacon sauerkraut recipe that follows was a hit at our July 4th festivities. The recipe is from Dietz & Watson, producers of premium deli meats. There are more recipes on the company website.

     
    *Sauerkraut, a fermented food, is an anti-carinogen, digestive aid, immune support aid and probiotic. It’s high in nutrition and very low in calories.

     

    Simply delish: bacon and sauerkraut. Photo
    courtesy Dietz & Watson.

     

    BACON SAUERKRAUT RECIPE

    Ingredients For 6 Servings

  • 9 slices bacon
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, chopped
  • 2 pounds sauerkraut, drained (save the juice!) and rinsed
  • 1-1/2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 cup sweet white wine, such as Muscat or Riesling
  • 1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 2 large Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, and thinly sliced
  • 1 large red skinned potato (about 3 ounces, peeled and grated)
  • Salt and freshly ground white pepper
  •  

    Preparation

    1. COOK the bacon in the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat until crisp, about 3 minutes.

    2. ADD the onions and garlic; sauté until golden brown, about 5 minutes.

    3. STIR in the drained sauerkraut, chicken stock, wine and caraway seeds.Bring to a boil over high heat.

    4. REDUCE heat to medium and cook about 45 minutes, until the stock is reduced by three-fourths.

    5. STIR in the apples and potato and cook about 45 minutes more, until the apples and potato are dissolved. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

      

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    FOOD FUN: A Salad Bowl Of Radicchio Leaves

    The Alcove Cafe & Bakery in Los Angeles creates a bowl from radicchio leaves, and fills it with salad. It’s not just pretty: It’s fun food!

    The Cafe serves it with their ginger shrimp, seared ginger-marinated shrimp with mixed greens, sauteed mushrooms, tomatoes and plum dressing, topped with enoki mushrooms. The dish is called “Ginger Shrimp Salad”—a bit of creative license, but if that makes people eat more salad greens, we’re all for it.

    So your food fun for the week is: Buy a large head of radicchio, remove the core, turn the leaves into a bowl and fill it with a colorful green salad.

     

    Eat the bowl! Photo courtesy Alcove Cafe | Los Angeles.

     
    WHAT IS RADICCHIO?

    Radicchio (rah-DEE-key-yo) is an Italian leaf chicory. There are different varieties, each named after the region in Italy where it is grown. The most common variety in the U.S. is radicchio di Chiogga, a round (pronounced key-YO-guh), tightly packed head of dark maroon leaves with thick white veins.

    Radicchio has a bitter taste that mellows when it is grilled or cooked. Available year-round, radicchio is quite nutritious: high in magnesium, potassium and vitamin A, with a mere 9.2 calories in a one-cup serving.

    When buying radicchio, pay attention to size. A fresh radicchio head should be about the size of a grapefruit. It you find one with a small, drier head, it likely means that it is older and the outer leaves have been pulled off to keep it looking good.

     
    CHECK OUT THESE RADICCHIO RECIPES.

      

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