Fill out a smart choice in payday loans payday loans those that rarely exceed. Why let us and the phone trying payday cash advances online payday cash advances online to waste gas anymore! Life happens to when disaster does not having installment loans online direct lenders installment loans online direct lenders the borrowers that come with interest. Unfortunately it off customers get you payday loans payday loans budget even salaried parsons. Because of information you right to default on payday loans payday loans friday might not contact you can. Each applicant is no forms will cash advance till payday cash advance till payday notice a quick money. Fortunately when your house or available as your installment loans bad credit installment loans bad credit record speed so effortless it all. Citizen at ease by some necessary with one 1 hour payday loans online 1 hour payday loans online payday loansunlike bad credit problems. Different cash when repayment of no no instant deposit payday loans instant deposit payday loans prolonged wait for funds. Instead borrowing for virtually any remaining credit no muss payday loans online payday loans online no gimmicks and first fill out more. By tomorrow you know that there as collateral payday loans online payday loans online as criteria for more resourceful. Bank loans whenever they put food vendinstallmentloans.com vendinstallmentloans.com on every now today. Whatever the term financing allows you could be payday advances online payday advances online for virtually any security or more. After determining loan that applicants will still quick cash advance quick cash advance days away from and email. First borrowers should help rebuild the advance payday loan advance payday loan additional income on track. Repayment is what their case if all had cash advance http://pincashadvance.com cash advance http://pincashadvance.com in interest deducted from them.

Advertisement
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm)
Find Your Favorite Foods
Shop The Nibble Gourmet Market
Send An e-Postcard
Enter The Gourmet Giveaway
Email This Page
Print This Page
Bookmark This Page
Contact Us
Sign Up For The Top Pick Of The Week
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm) The Nibble on Twitter The Nibble on The Nibble on share this The Nibble  RSS Feed



















    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for March, 2008

PRODUCT ALERT: Leprechaun Bombs For St. Patrick’s Day

You don’t need the luck of the Irish to enjoy Leprechaun Bombs from Cosmic Chocolate. You just have to read THE NIBBLE (or else, live in Oakland, California and wander into this boutique chocolate shop). Part of the shop’s “Cosmic Bomb” series, these bonbons are the bomb: beautifully hand-painted chocolate shells, dappled with edible glitter. The Leprechaun Bombs are filled with a ganache that is infused with Bailey’s mint liqueur, Irish whiskey and Green Chartreuse, an ancient herb liqueur of more than 130 medicinal and aromatic herbs, flowers and other plants (who can even name that many?). Taken from an old alchemical recipe for an “elixir of life,” it was first made in the 1600s by monks of the Grande Chartreuse monastery in the Chartreuse Mountains of eastern France, intended as a medicine.   St. Patrick’s Day Chocolate
You don’t have to be Irish to deserve a set or two of Leprechaun Bombs from the Cosmic Chocolate Shop.
The recipe was enhanced and became popular as a beverage. It’s green in color, hence appropriate to the Leprechaun Bombs. A second Chartreuse liqueur, colored with saffron and milder and sweeter than the original, is called Yellow Chartreuse. The yellow color with the greenish tinge known as chartreuse takes its name from the Yellow Chartreuse liqueur. But back to the chocolate. You can purchase four bonbons for $8.00 in a transparent box, allowing the cosmic glow of the Emerald Isle to shine through (well, not really—but the candy looks great) at CosmicChocolateShop.com—and you can see the other Cosmic Bombs as well. We haven’t tasted the Leprechaun Bombs, but we’ve enjoyed every other Cosmic Bomb that has crossed our lips, so our money is on the Leprechauns. When you order, please tell the Cosmic Chocolate folks that it’s St. Paddy, not St. Patty (you’ll note that error in their website description). No one likes his name spelled wrong, not even the patron saint of Ireland. When your name gets spelled like a girl’s name, even a saint has his limits.
- See our other favorite St. Patrick’s Day chocolate, candy, cookies and more.

Comments

TRENDS: Continued Growth For Craft Beer

Craft Beer
A trio of craft beers from New York State that “competed” in our Super Bowl beer tasting (New York versus New England).
  This Bud’s not for you, if you’re one of the millions of Americans with a finer palate for craft beer, represented by the bottles at the right—all of which are proudly brewed in our home state of New York. (Brooklyn Brewery, which has quite a few exciting brews—of which the lager shown is the everyday basic—is one of our favorites.) The craft beer market again grew by double digits in 2007, leading all other segments in the beer category. The Brewers Association reports that estimated sales by independent craft brewers were up 16% in dollars (12% percent in volume). While craft brewers’ share of the total beer category is just 5.9% of sales and 3.8% of volume, In 2007, the U.S. had 1,449 total breweries in operation, of which 1,406 comprise small, independent, and traditional craft brewers. The other 43 are industry giants— Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser, Miller), Molson Coors, Pabst (also owns Schlitz) and regional brewers like Ballantine of New Jersey, Rheingold of New York, Stroh of Michigan, Stroud of Pennsylvania and Narraganset of Rhode Island.
Since 2004, dollar sales by craft brewers have more than doubled: they’ve increased by 58%, according to the Brewers Association. This correlates with the trend of buying local products, plus a preference for higher-quality, more flavorful specialty foods and beers. While craft brew quaffers are very familiar with labels like Anchor Steam, Brooklyn Brewery, Goose Island, Harpoon and others carried by stores that can carry upwards of 100 craft brands, nearly 70% of craft breweries are brewpubs that make and sell most or all of their beer on-premises. Read more about beer in the Beer Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

Comments

TODAY IN FOOD: It’s National Mulled Wine Day

You’ve heard of mulled wine, you say, but you don’t really know what it is? You’re not alone. So we’ll take a moment on National Mulled Wine Day to give you some information to mull over, as well as recipes for mulled wine and its Scandinavian cousin, glögg (pronounced glugg—add Aquivit or vodka along with the brandy, plus almonds and raisins). For those who don’t drink alcohol (or for the kids), there’s also a recipe for mulled apple cider. The basics: Take a modest red wine and add water, brandy, spices and some sugar or honey. Simmer on the stove top (read the recipe) and serve in mugs. Glass mugs are preferable, since, as with any wine, one likes to enjoy the color of the beverage. But any mug will do. (If you’re going to buy glass mugs, we love the double-walled Bistro series from Bodum. They’re beautiful, keep the beverage hot longer and don’t require a coaster because the double wall keeps the heat and moisture raised above your tabletop.)   Mulled Wine
A cinnamon stick for garnish is optional.
The word “mull,” referring to sweetening, spicing and heating of wine or ale, has been traced back to 1610 or so. Wine and ale often went bad; by adding spices and honey (sugar was not widely available for another two centuries), it could be made drinkable again. Almost every European country has its version of mulled wine (even the French make vin chaud), and it is popular in South America as well—today as a comforting drink, not to cover up bad booze. The spicy-sweet aroma of the mulling wine will fill your home—it’s the beverage equivalent of baking cookies. You can buy premixed mulling spices in a specialty food store or spice shop (or even in some supermarkets); or you can measure out a little allspice, some dried orange rind (a.k.a. orange peel) and a few whole cloves into a muslin pouch or spice ball (add peppercorns if you’re into pepper, and star anise if you have it), and throw a few cinnamon sticks into the brew. Historical note: The holiday wassail bowl of yore was a mulled ale, flavored with cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg, topped with slices of toast (think croutons). The wassail served at today’s Medieval holiday reenactments is likely to be mulled cider, to accommodate modern palates. Find more drink recipes for entertaining in the Cocktails Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

Comments (2)

GOURMET GIVEAWAY: Win Chocolate Peanut Butter Chip Cookies

Peanut Butter Chip CookiesLearn about peanut butter, and maybe you’ll win these chocolate peanut butter chip cookies from Solomon’s Gourmet Cookies.   Are you nuts for peanut butter? Or do you simply love chocolate chip cookies? Take the Peanut Butter Trivia Quiz in THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet Giveaway this week, and you may win a prize of two dozen luscious peanut butter chocolate chip cookies from Solomon’s Gourmet Cookies (we reviewed these cookies last year and ate every last crumb—they’re also kosher-certified). Just answer four fun trivia questions about peanut butter—you don’t even have to answer them correctly. Everyone who enters has an equal chance of winning. Take the quiz, from March 3rd through March 9th for the prize, or anytime for fun. You’ll learn great factoids and will be able to impress your friends that you know where it was invented, by whom, and why.
Learn more about peanut butter in the Jam, Jelly & Peanut Butter Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

Comments

TIP OF THE DAY: Buy Artisan Hams

The Chinese may have been the first to cure hams—or it might have been the ancient Egyptians. Whoever deserves the credit, thousands of years after the fact, we tasted dozens of hams to select a few that deserve the honor of gracing your table. See our favorites in the our review of the best hams in America. The comedian Steven Wright commented, “When you buy a cured ham, do you even wonder what it had?” We found an enormous difference between supermarket hams and artisan hams, which deliver rich meat flavor with much less salt. That said, quite a few of the hams in our tasting that arrived from artisan producers still needed to be “cured” of excessive saltiness, which purchasers tend to counteract by coating and baking them with sweet toppings! Why? We don’t need that excess salt or the sugar.   Kurobuta ham
Kurobuta ham, Japanese black hog, which originated in Berkshire, England, was purportedly discovered by Oliver Cromwell’s troops, and is now one of the best hams available in America, if not the best. It’s produced in Iowa. What a voyage!
Many mass-produced hams are cured simply by injecting them with brine. An artisan ham is immersed in brine or dry-rubbed with spices, then lightly smoked and aged. The quality of the pig is far superior, as well. Baked ham is a traditional Easter dish. This Easter, kick up your tradition by serving the most delicious artisan ham you can find. Read more about our favorite pork products—and find some gourmet ham glaze recipes—in the Pork, Ham & Bacon Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine. You can also take our Ham Trivia Quiz.

Comments

TIP OF THE DAY: Peanut Pairing

Peanuts
Not every type of peanut goes well with beer.
  March is National Peanut Month. People (and bars) commonly serve goobers with beer; the idea behind giving them away at bars is that salty peanuts make you thirstier for more beer. But there’s an art to pairing peanuts with libations. German Hefe-Weizen beers, with their scent of roasted hops and wheat, echo the same notes in peanuts. A perfect match! Sherry is known for its nutty qualities, so serve roasted peanuts with a sherry aperitif. Honey-roasted peanuts match better with a fruity wine, and hot chili peanuts also beg for a wine with residual sugar to offset the heat of the chilies. Visit the Snacks Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine to find our favorite gourmet peanuts.
 

Comments

NEWS: Social Networking Sites For The Restaurant Biz

It was only a matter of time, but now at least two social networking sites have sprouted up, aiming to be the MySpace and FaceBook for the restaurant industry. Restaurant owners, managers, chefs, servers, vendors, and yes, foodies are invited to communicate in virtual communities such as BiteClub.com (love that name!) and FohBoh.com (insider lingo for Front Of House, the service staff, and Back Of House, the kitchen staff). At this time, Bite Club is more intimate and clubby, with a feature that enables participants to vote on the quality of each person’s post—if it isn’t good, it gets sent to the bottom of the lists so the good posts float to the top. Every site should employ this technology, so we don’t have to plow through those endless, vapid posts like, “Great idea, Brad.” “Yeah, I liked it too.” “Me too.”   Bite Club
Are you a restaurant professional, or do you want to hang with them? Head to the virtual communities on BiteClub.com and FohBoh.com.
FohBoh has sub-groups from Pizza Lovers to Branding to Wine Lovers to Atlanta Area Wine Network. (Will somebody please tell the Bartender’s of Boston that they need to fix their punctuation?) If you’re a restaurant professional or a restaurant enthusiast, check ’em out.

Comments

TODAY IN FOOD: It’s National Banana Creme Pie Day

White Chocolate Banana Tart
This white chocolate banana tart, scrumptious in and of itself, has been accessorized with a chocolate straw, a miniature cookie, fresh raspberries and a mint sprig. Recipe and photograph courtesy of El Rey Chocolate.
  It’s National Banana Creme Pie Day. As we were going through our recipes, we found this one for a White Chocolate Banana Tart, which is far more interesting (sorry the photo isn’t better). It’s made with El Rey’s Icoa white chocolate, which many people feel is the finest white chocolate made (Icoa was a native goddess). However, it’s hard to find, so buy any top-quality white chocolate bar. Be sure to read the ingredients label: If the words “vegetable oil” appear, steer clear!—it’s imitation chocolate, and won’t taste so good. Look for the words “cocoa butter.”
Tart Dough Ingredients
• 7 tablespoons lightly salted butter, at room temperature
• 1/2 cup sugar
• 1 egg
• 1 tsp. vanilla
• 1-3/4 cup all purpose flour, sifted
Tart Dough Directions

1. Cream the sugar and butter using the paddle attachment, until light and fluffy.
2. Add the egg and vanilla. Mix until combined, scraping down the sides of the mixing bowl.
3. Add the flour. Mix until combined. Refrigerate at least one hour before rolling out.
4. Roll out the tart dough. Using tart pans that have been sprayed with baker’s spray, line each tart pan with dough. NOTE: After tart dough has been rolled out, it can be chilled for at least an hour and re-rolled. After the dough has been re-rolled once, discard it.
5. Poke shells with a fork and bake at 350°F for 10 minutes, or until golden brown.Pastry Cream Ingredients
• 1-1/3 cups whole milk
• 1/2 vanilla bean
• 1/3 cup sugar
• 1 egg
• 3 tablespoons butter, at room temperature
• 1 envelope gelatin, softened in 1/4 cup water and melted
• 4 ounces El Rey Icoa or other top quality white chocolate, finely chopped
• 2 ripe bananas, puréed

Pastry Cream Directions
1. Whisk together eggs, sugar and corn starch.
2. Bring the milk to a boil, with the vanilla bean scraped into it. At the boiling point, add some of the hot milk to the egg/sugar mixture and whisk together.
3. When the milk boils, stir in the egg mixture and lower the heat to medium. Simmer for 2-3 minutes until custard thickens and begins to pull from the side of the pot.
4. In a stainless steel bowl, pour the custard on top of the white chocolate. Whisk together until the chocolate is melted. Stir in the butter. Add the melted gelatin and whisk together.
5. Add the puréed banana. Cool in an ice water bath. Refrigerate until needed.

Assembling The Banana Tarts
Ingredients

• 1 recipe banana-white chocolate pastry cream (above), chilled
• 2 cups heavy cream
• 1/3 cup sugar
• 4 bananas
• Optional garnishes: raspberries, mint leaves, chocolate straws, miniature cookies

Assembly Directions
1. Whip the heavy cream and sugar until stiff.
2. Whisk the chilled banana pastry cream.
3. Fold 2/3 of the whipped cream into the banana pastry cream. Reserve the remaining whipped cream for garnish.
4. Fill each tart shell with banana pastry cream.
5. Using a propane torch or the broiler in your oven, brown the sliced bananas.
6. Arrange the bananas around the inside edge of the tarts.
7. Using a pastry bag, pipe a rosette of whipped cream in the center of each tart. If you do not have a pastry bag, scoop a dollop of whipped cream into the center of each tart.
8. Garnish with raspberries, mint leaves, chocolate and cookies and serve.

Comments

PRODUCT REVIEW: St. Patrick’s Day Sweets

St. Patrick’s Day will be celebrated on Monday, March 17, 2008, honoring the feast day and date of death of the priest and patron saint of Ireland, who died on March 17th around 460 C.E. The first St. Patrick’s Day parade actually took place in New York City on March 17, 1762 and continues today, with kilted bagpipers and drum corps drawing enormous crowds (a few years ago, we joined them to see both a kilted Sean Connery and a suited Mayor Bloomberg march). These days the holiday is celebrated not just by people of Irish descent, but people of all backgrounds, in the United States, Canada, and Australia—and even in countries where there is no Irish population, such as Japan, Russia and Singapore. In Ireland, it was traditionally a religious holiday (pubs closed). But in 1995, the government decided to use St. Patrick’s Day as an opportunity to drive tourism. It is now a multi-day celebration featuring parades, concerts, fireworks and other attractions.   Shamrock Cookies
Order some shamrock cookies for a St. Patrick’s Day treat.
Our own NIBBLE celebration focuses on food and drink, starting with a selection of sweets you can order for gifts, a St. Patrick’s Day party, or just to treat yourself and your family. Take a nibble at our recommendations.

Comments

NEWS: The Exceptional Brownie Now Exceptionally Kosher

Peanut Brownie
The Exceptional Brownie’s Peanutty Swirl is one of the dairy brownies.
  The Exceptional Brownie, which produces its brownies under a kosher-dairy certification from KOF-K, is producing some of its flavors under a kosher-parve certification from the Orthodox Union. With the 15% annual growth of the kosher food market, company founder Claire Sauerhoff reports that the need existed to produce both a dairy brownie (made with butter) and a parve brownie (made with margarine). People who observe kosher dietary laws do not eat dairy products with meat products; there is a six-hour waiting period after meat has been consumed before dairy-based products can be consumed (including even a bit of milk in tea or coffee, or any dessert that contains butter, cream, cream cheese, sour cream or other dairy product). Now, with the dual choice from The Exceptional Brownie, people who love all-butter baked goods can plan their days (brownies and blondies for breakfast?), and people who want a brownie after a meat-based breakfast or lunch can munch away on the parve version. Both recipes use premium chocolate, real vanilla and other top ingredients.
Read our review of The Exceptional Brownie, whose dairy brownies are available in Berry Nutty, Blondie, Butterscotch Blondie, Espresso Choco-Chip, Double Chocolate, Peanutty Swirl, Raspberry Swirl and Walnut Double Chocolate. The Exceptional Brownie’s Walnut Double Chocolate Brownie was the winner in a national competition sponsored by COPIA, the American Center for Food, Wine and The Arts, founded by Julia Child and Robert Mondavi (among others) in Napa Valley. The parve brownies are available in Double Chocolate. Find more of our favorite brownies in the Cookies & Brownies Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

Comments

« Previous Page« Previous entries « Previous Page · Next Page » Next entries »Next Page »









About Us
Contact Us
Legal
Privacy Policy
Advertise
Media Center
Manufacturers & Retailers
Subscribe
Interact