Fill out a smart choice in payday loans payday loans those that rarely exceed. Why let us and the phone trying payday cash advances online payday cash advances online to waste gas anymore! Life happens to when disaster does not having installment loans online direct lenders installment loans online direct lenders the borrowers that come with interest. Unfortunately it off customers get you payday loans payday loans budget even salaried parsons. Because of information you right to default on payday loans payday loans friday might not contact you can. Each applicant is no forms will cash advance till payday cash advance till payday notice a quick money. Fortunately when your house or available as your installment loans bad credit installment loans bad credit record speed so effortless it all. Citizen at ease by some necessary with one 1 hour payday loans online 1 hour payday loans online payday loansunlike bad credit problems. Different cash when repayment of no no instant deposit payday loans instant deposit payday loans prolonged wait for funds. Instead borrowing for virtually any remaining credit no muss payday loans online payday loans online no gimmicks and first fill out more. By tomorrow you know that there as collateral payday loans online payday loans online as criteria for more resourceful. Bank loans whenever they put food vendinstallmentloans.com vendinstallmentloans.com on every now today. Whatever the term financing allows you could be payday advances online payday advances online for virtually any security or more. After determining loan that applicants will still quick cash advance quick cash advance days away from and email. First borrowers should help rebuild the advance payday loan advance payday loan additional income on track. Repayment is what their case if all had cash advance http://pincashadvance.com cash advance http://pincashadvance.com in interest deducted from them.

Advertisement
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm)
Find Your Favorite Foods
Shop The Nibble Gourmet Market
Send An e-Postcard
Enter The Gourmet Giveaway
Email This Page
Print This Page
Bookmark This Page
Contact Us
Sign Up For The Top Pick Of The Week
THE NIBBLE (TM) - Great Finds for Foodies (tm) The Nibble on Twitter The Nibble on The Nibble on share this The Nibble  RSS Feed



















    THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet News & Views

    Trends, Products & Items Of Note In The World Of Specialty Foods

    This is the blog section of THE NIBBLE. Read all of our content on TheNibble.com,
    the online magazine about gourmet and specialty food.

Archive for March, 2008

TODAY IN FOOD: It’s Oatmeal-Nut Waffles Day

Who thought up this food holiday, you might ask? Why not Blackberry Waffles Day, or Milk Chocolate Chip Waffles Day?

We’re guessing that Oatmeal-Nut Waffles Day is the work of nutritionists at the Whole Grain Council or some other group supporting oats—and they’re not wrong.

We need three portions of whole grains daily, and oatmeal waffles are a good start. As for the nuts, while they are high in calories and fat, they contain protein plus the good, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (omega-3s), which have all been shown to lower LDL cholesterol. (Your body needs two tablespoons of good fats daily.)

  • Waffles are a great way to limit portions of nuts (unlike, say, eating an entire bowl of mixed nuts).
  • Almonds, hazelnuts, peanuts, pecans, some pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts are approved by the FDA, since they contain less than 4g of saturated fats per 50g.
  • Walnuts are your best bet—they are more heart-healthy than olive oil and have bone-healthy alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an essential omega-3 fatty acid). But if you must have pecan waffles, we understand.
  •  
    Here’s a recipe to celebrate the day:

     

    Whole-Grain-Waffles-turvs.net-230-ps-sq

    Oatmeal or other whole grain waffles are better than white flour waffles. Nuts add protein. Photo courtesy Turvs.net.

     
    RECIPE: OATMEAL-NUT WAFFLES

    Ingredients

  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup quick-cooking rolled oats (oatmeal)
  • 1/2 cup coarsely-chopped nuts
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 1-1/2 cups whole milk
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • Optional garnishes: butter, fresh fruit, syrup, yogurt
  •  
    Preparation

    1. PREHEAT a lightly greased waffle iron.

    2. COMBINE the flour, oats, nuts, baking powder, cinnamon and salt in large mixing bowl. Set aside.

    3. MIX the eggs, milk, butter and brown sugar in small mixing bowl. Add this to the flour mixture, stirring until blended.

    4. POUR the batter onto the preheated waffle iron. The waffle iron needs to be hot enough to make a cold drop of water “dance.” When it’s hot enough, add the batter. Close the lid quickly, and do not open during baking.

    TIP: Cooking time varies by waffle iron, setting chosen, if the iron surface is coated (e.g. with Teflon), how much moisture is in the waffle batter, etc. You will need to experiment with your waffle iron. Look for steam escaping from the sides. When the steam stops, the waffles should be finished.

    5. REMOVE the finished waffles with a fork. Top with syrup or fresh fruit and/or yogurt.
     
    HOW MANY TYPES OF WAFFLES HAVE YOU HAD?

    Check them all out in our Pancake & Waffle Glossary, along with the history of waffles.

      

    Comments

    CONTEST: Green & Black’s Chocolate Recipe Challenge

    Green & Black’s Chocolate
    Make your recipe from Green & Black’s organic chocolate, and help cacao farmers in Belize.
      Love chocolate? Love organics? This one’s for you. Green & Black’s, the world’s largest brand of organic chocolate, is inviting organic chocolate lovers to submit an original recipe that contains no more than five ingredients, and incorporates at least 2 ounces of Green & Black’s chocolate—any variety, from white to milk to dark to extremely dark to inclusions (nuts, fruits). Write a short essay on your growing taste for organic foods and how your recipe wows your family and friends, and include a photo of the prepared dish. You have until April 21, 2008 to submit your recipe. Five winners and their guests will enjoy a food-filled trip to New York City to the “Academy Awards” of the food industry, the James Beard Foundation Awards & Gala. Winners will start by shopping for organic ingredients at some of New York’s finest markets, and take them to a cooking session with Curtis Stone, star of TLC’s “Take Home Chef.”
    All entrants to Green & Black’s Chocolate Challenge will be helping cocoa farmers in Belize. For each valid entry received, Green & Black’s supplying the members of Belize’s Toledo Cacao Growers’ Association cooperative with funds to plant and grow to maturity one hardwood tree. Hardwood trees are a reinvestment in the indigenous rainforest, and help to provide the necessary shade to shelter the farmers’ cacao trees. Each shade tree as helps a cacao tree thrive, thus providing the farmers with greater economic potential. NIBBLE TIP: We’ve judged a few recipe contests, and it isn’t the obvious cake or mousse recipe that always takes the cake. Think outside the box and submit a recipe using Green & Black’s chocolate where it isn’t so obvious. Just don’t submit anything like our own Chocolate-Stuffed French Toast recipe—we’re going to enter that one! Learn more and get entry information at GreenandBlacks.com.

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: St. Patrick’s Day Eggs

    You don’t have to hunt for green bagels for St. Patrick’s Day breakfast. Start your day with a nutritious green breakfast by adding pesto sauce to the eggs beaten for scrambled eggs, omelets, a frittata or quiche. Mix in one teaspoon per egg. Decorate the plate with fresh basil or spinach leaves, and you’ll start the day in a holiday mood. You’d think pesto would be a pretty simple proposition: basil (or other green, like spinach or arugula), oil (usually olive, sometimes walnut or other oil), Parmesan and nuts (usually pine, nuts, but walnut pestos and other recipes are pretty fine). Yet, we tasted more than 100 pesto sauces from around the world and found only six brands to recommend to you, two of which were from recent Top Pick Of The Week sauce maker, Sauces ‘n Love. Read about our favorite pestos, the history of pesto and a recipe for making great pesto at home. When you realize how easy it is, you’ll become a pesto-making maverick.   Pesto
    Use pesto sauce to make green eggs on St. Patrick’s Day. Ham is optional with your green eggs, but you can enter our Gourmet Giveaway to win a great one this week. Photo by Val Lyashov | SXC.
    Read about more of our favorite sauces in the Pasta & Sauces Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Jazzy Vinaigrette

    Raspberry Vinegar
    Add a splash of raspberry flavor to your vinaigrette.
      Looking to add a little pizazz to your everyday salad dressing? Try a raspberry vinaigrette—two parts raspberry vinegar, three parts olive oil. The sweet raspberry fruit shines through, as does its ruby color. While raspberry vinegars are available for as little as $3.50 a bottle—they can be made less expensively with raspberry flavoring—we splurge on the opulent French vinegar of J. Leblanc, made from the juice of fresh raspberries blended into white wine vinegar, then aged in oak barrels. It also makes a splendid addition to fish sauces, marinades and luncheon salads—especially with sliced duck or chicken. It adds magic when you substitute it for cider vinegar, for example, in cole slaw, potato salad and gazpacho. It can be drizzled on fruit, cheese, bread, ice cream, cheesecake…in fact, you can mix a spoonful into apple juice, iced tea, lemonade and other beverages. It also makes a great gift for your favorite cook or foodie. If you can’t find the brand locally, it is sold on Amazon. Find more of our favorite vinegars in the Oiis & Vinegars Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.
     

    Comments

    GOURMET GIVEAWAY: Win An Easter Ham

    Take our Ham Trivia Quiz #2 in THE NIBBLE’s Gourmet Giveaway this week, and you may win a prize of an Easter ham. This is not just any ham, but our favorite ham from the ham artisans at Ham I Am, a NIBBLE Top Pick Of The Week (read the review). It’s 12 to 14 pounds and feeds up to 24 people (or provides ham sandwiches for the family for a week after Easter.) Just answer four fun trivia questions about ham—you don’t even have to answer them correctly. Everyone who enters has an equal chance of winning. Take the quiz, from March 10th through March 16th for the prize, or anytime for fun. You’ll learn the 411 about what makes a great ham, in the process. Learn more and enter. Read more about our favorite hams in the Pork, Ham & Bacon Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.   Win Me
    Win this 12- to 14-pound ham for Easter dinner.
     

    Comments

    PRODUCT REVIEW: Mexican & Hispanic Cheeses

    Mexican Cheese
    A stack of Hispanic cheeses. Roth Käse’s aged, Manchego-style GranQueso is on top.
      Half of the top 10 fastest-growing cheeses at retail are Hispanic-style cheeses—queso blanco, queso fresco, cotija, more than a dozen types. So, we took a giant nibble and created a muy gran article on the topic. While some cheeses are imported, only cheeses aged 60 days or longer can enter the country; so the fresh cheeses used for cooking—queso blanco, queso fresco, queso para freir, panela and requeson—are being made in the U.S.—in large numbers in California and Wisconsin. The other categories include melting cheeses and aged cheeses. We promise a tasty introduction to Mexican/Hispanic cheeses.

    Read the article and master Mexican cheese. Discover many more cheeses in the Cheese Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

    Comments

    NEWS: Ice Cream Heaven

    As part of a recent 2008 Flavor Trends luncheon, McComick & Company allowed us to taste the most menu, including frozen desserts prepared by artisan gelateria Il Laboratorio del Gelato. Rose Poppyseed Gelato was a revelation, making us wonder why no one has thought to do poppyseed ice cream before—don’t we all enjoy a good slice of lemon poppyseed cake? Here, the flavor of rose tasted almost peachlike, making us count the days to peach season so we can make Peach Poppyseed as well. Lychee Lemongrass Sorbetto was so exquisite, our tongue froze eating too much of it. Chile Chocolate Gelato, made with ancho chile, should take off big-time at better Mexican restaurants and homemade ice cream shops. We actually wrote this post a month ago, but haven’t had the heart to publish it because we are so tortured because there’s NO MORE GELATO. Thai Chile Chocolate is available from the store and website, but much as we love the spicy chocolate, we’ve been obsessing about the other two. Jon Snyder, when will you end our misery by putting them on the menu?   Rose Poppy Gelato
    Rose and Poppyseed Gelato from Il Laboratorio del Gelato, inspired by McCormick’s 2008 flavor trends.
    Read more about our favorite ice creams in the Desserts Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

    Comments

    TODAY IN FOOD: It’s National Crabmeat Day

    Jumbo Lump Crabmeat
    The whitest, biggest chunks of crab—known as Jumbo Lump crabmeat—are also the priciest.
      How can you celebrate National Crabmeat Day and still have change to spare? Here’s the secret: Those pretty puffs of lump white crabmeat on the buffet are up to three times the price of the darker body crabmeat. But the darker meat is actually tastier. If you’re mixing the crab into a salad for sandwiches (think crab rolls, like lobster rolls, or serve it on brioche, as a crabmeat BLT) or to stuff eggs or omelet, save money—and enjoy crab more often—by using dark crabmeat.

    Also celebrate National Crabmeat Day by:
    - Learning about the different types of crab and crabmeat, and what you should look for when you purchase canned crab.
    - Read our review of Miller’s Select, our favorite brand of crabmeat (it’s shelf-stable too, no refrigeration required).
    - Make one of these crabmeat recipes.
    - Buy this nifty little crab cookbook: Crab: Buying, Cooking, Cracking, by Andrea Froncillo and Jennifer Jeffrey.
     

    Comments

    TODAY IN FOOD: It’s National Cereal Day

    Does National Cereal Day sound like nothing to get worked up over…because you enjoy that bowl of Cheerios 365 days a year? Are you bummed that it isn’t National Bacon Cheeseburger Day or National Apple Pie À La Mode Day? Show a little love, please! Cereals are wild grasses, subsequently cultivated. Their edible grains, or seeds, are staple crops throughout the world (that means that the crops are grown in greater quantities, and provide more energy calories, than other crops). In some developing nations, grain constitutes almost the entire diet. But, here’s a happier factoid: Cereal takes its name from Ceres, the Roman goddess of harvest and agriculture. (The Greek goddess equivalent is Demeter.)   Wheat
    Amber waves of grain. Note the grains, or seeds, at the top of the stalk. Edible kernels are inside the husks.
    Corn, wheat and rice account for 87% of cereals grown worldwide—wheat in temperate regions, rice in tropical regions, corn in the Americas and Africa. Many grains are grown for livestock and for specific human uses—barley (for beer and other malted foods), millet, oats, rye and sorghum (used to make a sweetener). Buckwheat and quinoa (an incredibly high-protein, nutritious grain), both food crops, are not true grasses, but “psuedocereals.”- Read about some of our favorite grain-based foods in the Breads Section and Cereals Section of THE NIBBLE.com.
    - Read our feature about whole grain cereals.

    Comments

    TIP OF THE DAY: Bake Shamrock Cookies For St. Patrick’s Day

    Shamrock Cookies
    Bite me, I’m Irish.
      You’ve got plenty of time to find a shamrock cookie cutter before the St. Patrick’s Day festivities begin. Then, bake up a batch of delicious butter cookies. (If you don’t have a shamrock cookie cutter, you can always make regular shapes with green décor.) Use your own favorite recipe, or try this recipe from Land O’ Lakes. Unless you need to use margarine for dietary reasons, always use butter—fresh butter, not a bar that’s been sitting in the refrigerator for a month, picking up flavors from other foods. You can also use the shamrock cookie cutter to make shamrock toasts for hors d’oeuvres, shamrock pancakes and even vegetable cut-outs.
    If you don’t want to bake, treat yourself to these hand-decorated cookies from Eleni’s, a NIBBLE Top Pick Of The Week (read our review).
    - See more of our favorite cookies in the Cookies & Brownies Section of THE NIBBLE online magazine.

    Comments

    « Previous Page« Previous entries « Previous Page · Next Page » Next entries »Next Page »









    About Us
    Contact Us
    Legal
    Privacy Policy
    Advertise
    Media Center
    Manufacturers & Retailers
    Subscribe
    Interact